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Christian Origins and Hellenistic Judaism

Social and Literary Contexts for the New Testament

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Edited by Stanley E. Porter and Andrew Pitts

In Christian Origins and Hellenistic Judaism, Stanley E. Porter and Andrew W. Pitts assemble an international team of scholars whose work has focused on reconstructing the social matrix for earliest Christianity through reference to Hellenistic Judaism and its literary forms. Each essay moves forward the current understanding of how primitive Christianity situated itself in relation to evolving Greco-Roman Jewish culture. Some essays focus on configuring the social context for the origins of the Jesus movement and beyond, while others assess the literary relation between early Christian and Hellenistic Jewish texts.

The Divine Father

Religious and Philosophical Concepts of Divine Parenthood in Antiquity

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Edited by Felix Albrecht and Reinhard Feldmeier

The present volume is devoted to the theme of "Divine Father" in Second Temple Jewish and early Christian tradition and in its ancient pagan contexts. It brings together proceedings of a conference under the same title, held in Göttingen in September 2011. Selected articles by well-known scholars focus on religious and philosophical concepts of divine parenthood in antiquity, from the Hebrew Bible and Second Temple Judaism (the Dead Sea Scrolls, Targums, Philo and Josephus) to the field of the New Testament. In addition, the volume deals with the designation of deity as "father" or "mother" from the broad spectrum of ancient Egypt and classical antiquity (Homer, Hesiod, Plato, and its reception) to late antiquity (Plotinus and Porphyry).

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Jörg Frey

For the present purpose, we can leave aside these references, and concentrate on the texts that help us to understand the idea of the divine or holy spirit. Here, I will particularly focus on two most important texts, the Treatise on the Two Spirits in the Community Rule, and the Hodayot (because in

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Devorah Dimant

in the Qumranic system of ideas. The present survey aims to fill this gap. In order to unfold the full breadth of the concealing/revealing theme in the sectarian context, I will survey the verbs expressing concealment, חבא (“hide”) and סתר (“conceal”), as well as גלה (“reveal, uncover”), 7

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Noam Mizrahi

Temple Judaism. 2 Be that as it may, the sheer number of its copies indicates that the Songs held a central place in the cultic practice and hence, presumably, also in the religious worldview of the community or communities whose writings were unearthed in the Judean Desert. The purpose of the present

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Jonathan Ben-Dov

. Many scholars and studies take positions along the imaginary axis drawn here, emphasizing either the continuity or the disruption in Jewish literary creativity of the Second Temple period. The present survey draws samples from the vast scholarly discussion of this axis. It has been pointed out that the

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Matthew S. Goldstone

’s comments on this biblical verse. In the present chapter I argue that Sifre Devarim expands Sifra ’s problematization of rebuke and offers a clearer sociological motivation for refraining from correcting others. Beyond the formal concern of attempting to perform a commandment while ultimately

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Matthew S. Goldstone

circumstances for, and relevance of, reproof. For the present investigation, the most important non-Jewish (but scripturally-oriented) community that entertained such issues was the desert fathers of Egypt. These monastic figures of the 3rd through 5th centuries bequeathed a valuable collection of traditions

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Menahem Kister

its Structure The short fragment with which we are dealing consists of three sections. 19 I first present the text and its units: 20 [A] (14) Do not be misyoked with unbelievers (Μὴ γίνεσθε ἑτεροζυγοῦντες ἀπίστοις). For what partnership have righteousness and lawlessness? Or what fellowship has