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Renaissance Encounters

Greek East and Latin West

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Edited by Marina S. Brownlee and Dimitri H. Gondicas

The present volume has grown out of the conference held at Princeton University on November 12-14, 2009. Its essays explore a coherent, interrelated nexus of topics that illuminate our understanding of the cultural transactions (social, political, economic, religious and artistic) of the Greek East and Latin West: unexpected cultural appropriations and forms of resistance, continuity and change, the construction and hybridization of traditions in a wide expanse of the eastern Mediterranean. Areas that the volume addresses include the benefits and liabilities of periodization, philosophical and political exchanges, monastic syncretism between the Orthodox and Catholic faiths, issues of romance composition, and economic currency and the currency of fashion as East and West interact.
Contributors are Roderick Beaton, Peter Brown, Marina S. Brownlee, Giles Constable, Maria Evangelatou, Dimitri Gondicas, Judith Herrin, Elizabeth Jeffreys, Marc D. Lauxtermann, Stuart M. McManus, John Monfasani, Maria G. Parani, Linda Safran, Teresa Shawcross and Alan M. Stahl.

Gregory of Nyssa: Contra Eunomium II

An English Version with Supporting Studies - Proceedings of the 10th International Colloquium on Gregory of Nyssa (Olomouc, September 15-18, 2004)

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Edited by Lenka Karfíková, Scot Douglass and Johannes Zachhuber

The volume contains the contributions presented during the 10th International Colloquium on Gregory of Nyssa, Contra Eunomium II, held in Olomouc, the Czech Republic, on September 15-18, 2004. It is organized into four major sections: (I) Two papers (Th. Kobusch, B. Studer) that contextualize the main problematic of the Second Book Against Eunomius – the theory of language and the problem of naming God – from a broader philosophical and theological perspective; (II) a new English translation of the text (S. G. Hall); (III) a series of main papers providing commentary on its passages (Th. Böhm, M. Ludlow, Ch. Apostolopoulos, A. Meredith, J. Zachhuber, L. Karfíková, J. S. O’Leary, V. H. Drecoll); and (IV) numerous short essays discussing related philosophical (E. Moutsopoulos, G. Arabatzis, J. Demetracopoulos, L. Chvátal, Th. Alexopoulos, G. Lekkas, T. Tollefsen), as well as theological (T. Dolidze, S. Douglass, A. Ojell, A.-G. Keidel, T. Aptsiauri, J. Rexer) issues.

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Ellen Scully

In Physicalist Soteriology in Hilary of Poitiers, Ellen Scully presents Hilary as a representative of the “mystical” or “physical” trajectory of patristic soteriology most often associated with the Greek fathers. Scully shows that Hilary’s physicalism is unique, both in its Latin non-Platonic provenance and its conceptual foundation, namely that the incarnation has salvific effects for all humanity because Christ’s body contains every human individual.

Hilary’s soteriological conviction that all humans are present in Christ’s body has theological ramifications that expand beyond soteriology to include christology, eschatology, ecclesiology, and Trinitarian theology. In detailing these ramifications, Scully illumines the pervasive centrality of physicalism in Hilary’s theology while correcting standard soteriological presentations of physicalism as an exclusively Greek phenomenon.

Eduard Iricinschi

convert Trypho and his friends to a version of Christian practices, palatable for a Jewish audience. The author justifies Justin’s choice of the heresiological discourse to appeal to Jews by presenting heresy not only as the fulfillment of a prophecy but also as similar, in its social structure, to the

Devin L. White

incense then he will combine equal amounts of pure frankincense, cinnamon, onyx, and myrrh according to the Law. These are the tetrad of the virtues: for if they are full and present in equal measure, the mind will not be betrayed. Ch. 2 Once purified by the fullness of the virtues, the soul prepares the

Clarifying the Eclipse

Ascetics, Politics, and the Poetics of Power in Post-Roman Iberia

David Ungvary

[…] I have addressed all these matters in a brief document, presenting them just as they were formulated by the scholars of antiquity and especially in the works of catholic authors. For to know the nature of these things is not superstitious knowledge, as long as they are investigated in accordance

Ian N. Mills

may consult the human soul. The case for the One True God need not appeal to philosophical training but to ordinary experience. While still relevant to the question at hand, Tertullian’s statement is not, as often presented, a straightforward description of exclusively internal readership. First

Willem J. C. Blom

Suetonius did not mean that Chrestus was present in Rome in 49 CE when writing “ impulsore Chresto ”. 19 For Orosius, who cites this passage and relates it to Christ, the word choice of Suetonius was apparently not a problem. Furthermore, it is very well possible that the source of Suetonius was mistaken

Jan N. Bremmer

present an exhaustive survey of early Lycaonian Christianity, based on both literary and, especially, non-literary sources. Its size, over 1000 pages, prevents me of course from a detailed discussion. Yet I will try to give an impression of this impressive book, which is unequalled in its thoroughness