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Zeʾev Safrai

a guarantee of regular pilgrimages and visits to the holy sites. The ideological aspect of the attitude to the Land of Israel has been discussed to some extent in the scholarly research, and its main points are familiar. The present work does not focus on ideology, but rather on everyday life, and

Series:

Zeʾev Safrai

statements. For the purpose of the present study, it is important to point out two components that are not strictly theological. The first component is popular theology, i.e., what the masses thought when they wanted to fulfil God’s word, without being aware of all the details of theological thought and

Series:

Zeʾev Safrai

assertive Diaspora. Consequently, all these documents must also be approached together as one literary genre that merits a discussion of their common characteristics, as well as the differences between them. This is done in the present, concluding chapter. Our main target is to compare the real concern of

Series:

Zeʾev Safrai

, this is a later and less reliable book than the other chronicles. Continuation of The Chronicle of Abu ’l-Fath. This book pretends to ‘continue’ the last chronicle and present the history of the Samaritans from the seventh century on. But this book has nothing to do with The Chronicle of Abu ’l

Series:

Zeʾev Safrai

site that transform it into a holy place, and such miracles tend to continue to be performed in its surroundings by God or the deities concerned. Thus a holy site is an interface between the earthly and the divine, between the nondescript present and a mythological, happy past. It is the gateway of

Series:

Zeʾev Safrai

present chapter is to study the contexts, the problems, the literary forms and structure, and the content of the passages in rabbinic literature concerned with the Land. 3.1 The Land-Dependent Commandments 1 3.1.1 Halakha and Sanctity In a long process, the discourse represented by the halakha (Jewish

Series:

Zeʾev Safrai

will occasionally figure in the overviews in the present chapter, a separate discussion will be devoted to them in Chapter 3. Not only is Josephus an outstanding resource for our subject, but his descriptions of the Land are also characterized by a feature we do not find in other Jewish writings of the

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Zeʾev Safrai

of Judea. 4 The information is correct, but it is presented in a manner in keeping with the purposes of the author. This passage is particularly indicative of Josephus’ treatment of relevant material and his knowledge of the Land of Israel. There are numerous such examples of correct and exact

Series:

Zeʾev Safrai

and the lands of the non-Jewish nations are unclean, because the latter do not bury their dead. This, however, is patently a technical reason, which conceals a spiritual conception of the sanctity of the Land. 46 As we have seen 47 elusions to a similar basic idea are already present in the Bible

Series:

Ze'ev Safrai

Seeking out the Land describes the study of the Holy Land in the Roman period and examines the complex connections between theology, social agenda and the intellectual pursuit. Holiness as a theological concept determines the intellectual agenda of the elite society of writers seeking to describe the land, as well as their preoccupation with its physical aspects and their actual knowledge about it.
Ze'ev Safrai succeeds in examining all the ancient monotheistic literature, both Jewish and Christian, up to the fourth century CE, and in demonstrating how all the above-mentioned factors coalesce into a single entity. We learn that in both religions, with all their various subgroups, the same social and religious factors were at work, but with differing intensity.