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The Space of Time

A Sensualist Interpretation of Time in Augustine, Confessions X to XII

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David van Dusen

From Robert Grosseteste to Jean-François Lyotard, Augustine’s suggestion that time is a “dilation of the soul” ( distentio animi) has been taken up as a seminal and controversial time-concept, yet in The Space of Time, David van Dusen argues that this ‘dilation’ has been fundamentally misinterpreted.
Time in Confessions XI is a dilation of the senses—in beasts, as in humans. And Augustine’s time-concept in Confessions XI is not Platonic—but in schematic terms, Epicurean.
Identifying new influences on the Confessions—from Aristoxenus to Lucretius—while keeping Augustine’s phenomenological interpreters in view, The Space of Time is a path-breaking work on Confessions X to XII and a ranging contribution to the history of the concept of time.

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Ellen Scully

In Physicalist Soteriology in Hilary of Poitiers, Ellen Scully presents Hilary as a representative of the “mystical” or “physical” trajectory of patristic soteriology most often associated with the Greek fathers. Scully shows that Hilary’s physicalism is unique, both in its Latin non-Platonic provenance and its conceptual foundation, namely that the incarnation has salvific effects for all humanity because Christ’s body contains every human individual.

Hilary’s soteriological conviction that all humans are present in Christ’s body has theological ramifications that expand beyond soteriology to include christology, eschatology, ecclesiology, and Trinitarian theology. In detailing these ramifications, Scully illumines the pervasive centrality of physicalism in Hilary’s theology while correcting standard soteriological presentations of physicalism as an exclusively Greek phenomenon.

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Justin King

prevalence of these core concepts of speech-in-character, one should expect most if not all of these elements to be present in any appropriation of the exercise, including the writings of Paul and other early Christians. The presence or absence of these unique elements will depend, first, on precisely what

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Justin King

. First, none of Theon’s “examples” present the supposed speech. Second, Theon’s example of προσωποποιία using Datis as a specific speaker is a completely hypothetical scenario, so there is no concrete example to examine in his source text(s). 16 Third, the only example Theon provides for which an

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Justin King

, abstract ideas, inanimate objects, or the dead. When examining concrete examples of speech-in-character, one should expect all or most of these features to be present. 1 The comparative analyses, however, also revealed the unique, or less attested, elements represented in each text. For instance

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Justin King

informis fit eloquens, et forma ei et oratio adtribuitur ad dignitatem adcommodata aut actio quaedam. [ Conformatio ] consists in representing an absent person [ non adest persona ] as present [ adsit ], or in making a mute thing or one lacking form articulate, and attributing to it a definite form [ forma

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Justin King

θῆλυ· πάντες γὰρ ὑµεῖς εἷς ἐστε ἐν Χριστῴ Ἰησοῦ. 1 Atlanta, 2015. 2 For two examples, Joshua Garroway, “Under Sin: Finding the Antecedent for Paul’s Charge in Rom 3:9b” (paper presented at the annual meeting of the SBL , Atlanta, November 21, 2015); Michael T. Graham Jr., “An Examination of Paul’s Use

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Justin King

communicates to them a more general or bigger premise in the argument, Paul’s tone towards them is more educational than anything else. In Rom 11 and 12–15, Paul shows his audience that there is more to the interlocutor than meets the eye (still not polemically), but at the present he only aims to illustrate

Frederick E. Brenk on Plutarch, Religious Thinker and Biographer

“The Religious Spirit of Plutarch of Chaironeia” and “The Life of Mark Antony”

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Frederick E Brenk

Edited by Lautaro Roig Lanzillotta

The present book Frederick E. Brenk: Plutarch, Religious Thinker and Biographer, “The Religious Spirit of Plutarch of Chaironeia” and “The Life of Mark Antony” includes the updated and revised version of two seminal articles on Plutarch by F. E. Brenk published thirty years ago in ANRW. Edited by Lautaro Roig Lanzillotta, both articles cover the two sides of Plutarch’s corpus, the Lives and Moralia.

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Justin King

course contains the caveat that the form of speech-in-character presented here must be a form of speech-in-character that could have been relevant to Paul. So, the primary sources examined must not only discuss speech-in-character, but they must also pre-date or be in close chronological proximity to