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Johannes Tromp

This volume contains the first critical edition of the Life of Adam and Eve in Greek, based on all available manuscripts. In the introduction the history of previous research is summarized, and the extant manuscripts are presented. Next comes a description of the grammatical characteristics of the manuscripts’ texts, followed by a detailed study of the genealogical relationships between them, resulting in a reconstruction of the writing’s history of transmission in Greek. On the basis of all this information, the Greek text of the Life of Adam and Eve in its earliest attainable stage, is established. The text edition is accompanied by a full critical apparatus, in which all relevant evidence from the manuscripts is recorded. Several indices complete this volume.

Gregory of Nyssa: Contra Eunomium II

An English Version with Supporting Studies - Proceedings of the 10th International Colloquium on Gregory of Nyssa (Olomouc, September 15-18, 2004)

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Edited by Lenka Karfíková, Scot Douglass and Johannes Zachhuber

The volume contains the contributions presented during the 10th International Colloquium on Gregory of Nyssa, Contra Eunomium II, held in Olomouc, the Czech Republic, on September 15-18, 2004. It is organized into four major sections: (I) Two papers (Th. Kobusch, B. Studer) that contextualize the main problematic of the Second Book Against Eunomius – the theory of language and the problem of naming God – from a broader philosophical and theological perspective; (II) a new English translation of the text (S. G. Hall); (III) a series of main papers providing commentary on its passages (Th. Böhm, M. Ludlow, Ch. Apostolopoulos, A. Meredith, J. Zachhuber, L. Karfíková, J. S. O’Leary, V. H. Drecoll); and (IV) numerous short essays discussing related philosophical (E. Moutsopoulos, G. Arabatzis, J. Demetracopoulos, L. Chvátal, Th. Alexopoulos, G. Lekkas, T. Tollefsen), as well as theological (T. Dolidze, S. Douglass, A. Ojell, A.-G. Keidel, T. Aptsiauri, J. Rexer) issues.

The Divine Father

Religious and Philosophical Concepts of Divine Parenthood in Antiquity

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Edited by Felix Albrecht and Reinhard Feldmeier

The present volume is devoted to the theme of "Divine Father" in Second Temple Jewish and early Christian tradition and in its ancient pagan contexts. It brings together proceedings of a conference under the same title, held in Göttingen in September 2011. Selected articles by well-known scholars focus on religious and philosophical concepts of divine parenthood in antiquity, from the Hebrew Bible and Second Temple Judaism (the Dead Sea Scrolls, Targums, Philo and Josephus) to the field of the New Testament. In addition, the volume deals with the designation of deity as "father" or "mother" from the broad spectrum of ancient Egypt and classical antiquity (Homer, Hesiod, Plato, and its reception) to late antiquity (Plotinus and Porphyry).

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Edited by Christl M. Maier

This volume presents the main lectures of the 21st Congress of the International Organization for the Study of the Old Testament (IOSOT) held in Munich, Germany, in August 2013. Seventeen internationally distinguished scholars present their current research on the Hebrew Bible, including the literary history of the Hebrew text, its Greek translation and history of interpretation. Some focus on archeological sources and the reconstruction of ancient Israelite religion while others discuss the formation of the biblical text and its impact for cultural memory. The volume gives readers a representative view of the most recent developments in the study of the Old Testament.

Contributors are: Olivier Artus, Ehud Ben Zvi, Beate Ego, Irmtraud Fischer, Christian Frevel, Shimon Gesundheit, Timothy P. Harrison, Louis C. Jonker, James L. Kugel, Christoph Levin, Amihai Mazar, Steven L. McKenzie, Konrad Schmid, Yvonne Sherwood, Zipora Talshir, Akio Tsukimoto, and Jacques Vermeylen.

Linguistic Manifestations in the Trimorphic Protennoia and the Thunder: Perfect Mind

Analysed against the Background of Platonic and Stoic Dialectics

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Tilde Bak Halvgaard

Both the Thunder: Perfect Mind (NHC VI,2) and the Trimorphic Protennoia (NHC XIII,1) present their readers with goddesses who descend in such auditive terms as sound, voice, and word. In Linguistic Manifestations in the Trimorphic Protennoia and the Thunder: Perfect Mind, Tilde Bak Halvgaard argues that these presentations reflect a philosophical discussion about the nature of words and names, utterances and language, as well as the relationship between language and reality, inspired especially by Platonic and Stoic dialectics.
Her analysis of these linguistic manifestations against the background of ancient philosophy of language offers many new insights into the structure of the two texts and the paradoxical sayings of the Thunder: Perfect Mind.

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Loren T. Stuckenbruck

1 Introduction The present discussion is concerned with the relation between the past and the future in the Serekh ha-Milḥamah. 1 As is well known, the narrative portions preserved among materials related to Serekh ha-Milḥamah are primarily cast with future events in mind. Indeed, in sections

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Justin King

course contains the caveat that the form of speech-in-character presented here must be a form of speech-in-character that could have been relevant to Paul. So, the primary sources examined must not only discuss speech-in-character, but they must also pre-date or be in close chronological proximity to

Series:

Justin King

of the subject of each line, such as “the self-proclaimed Jew” (cf. 2:17) or the like. Unsurprisingly, this renders discerning the dialogical script of Rom 3:1–9 terribly difficult. For the most part, scholars have presented three opposing scripts of the dialogue. First, the traditional reading of

Series:

Matthew S. Goldstone

navigate the tension between the judicial and moral dimensions of rebuke. In contrast to this binary approach, the present chapter demonstrates how the DSS and the Gospels each include texts that gravitate toward opposing ends of the moral-judicial spectrum. The DSS preserve a text that leans toward

Series:

Emilie M. van Opstall

always what Smith refers to as a ‘storied place’ connected to a culturally important narrative (Smith 2008). The present book aims to elucidate the transition from the worldly to the divine by focussing on doors leading to spaces considered to be holy in Late Antiquity. In ‘pagan’ 2 as well as in