Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 7 of 7 items for :

  • All: "presentism" x
  • Religion in Antiquity x
Clear All

Series:

Edited by Ilinca Tanaseanu-Döbler and Marvin Döbler

Although religious education is a much-debated topic in present-day History of Religions, its study focuses almost exclusively on contemporary phenomena. Furthermore, this field of study still lacks a comprehensive theoretical framework to structure research. The volume presented here explores religious education from a historical perspective, focusing on source material from pre-modern Europe. Scholars from the History of Religions, Theology, Classical Philology, Medieval Studies and Byzantine Studies contribute their expertise to analyse selected aspects of religious education in Antiquity, Byzantium and the Middle Ages, highlighting the diverse concepts of education, educational contents, actors, media, methods, ideals and intentions at play, and anchoring their case studies in the broader panorama of European history. Based on this material, the editors propose a systematic framework to map the research field.

Eduard Iricinschi

convert Trypho and his friends to a version of Christian practices, palatable for a Jewish audience. The author justifies Justin’s choice of the heresiological discourse to appeal to Jews by presenting heresy not only as the fulfillment of a prophecy but also as similar, in its social structure, to the

Devin L. White

incense then he will combine equal amounts of pure frankincense, cinnamon, onyx, and myrrh according to the Law. These are the tetrad of the virtues: for if they are full and present in equal measure, the mind will not be betrayed. Ch. 2 Once purified by the fullness of the virtues, the soul prepares the

Clarifying the Eclipse

Ascetics, Politics, and the Poetics of Power in Post-Roman Iberia

David Ungvary

[…] I have addressed all these matters in a brief document, presenting them just as they were formulated by the scholars of antiquity and especially in the works of catholic authors. For to know the nature of these things is not superstitious knowledge, as long as they are investigated in accordance

Ian N. Mills

may consult the human soul. The case for the One True God need not appeal to philosophical training but to ordinary experience. While still relevant to the question at hand, Tertullian’s statement is not, as often presented, a straightforward description of exclusively internal readership. First

Willem J. C. Blom

Suetonius did not mean that Chrestus was present in Rome in 49 CE when writing “ impulsore Chresto ”. 19 For Orosius, who cites this passage and relates it to Christ, the word choice of Suetonius was apparently not a problem. Furthermore, it is very well possible that the source of Suetonius was mistaken

Jan N. Bremmer

present an exhaustive survey of early Lycaonian Christianity, based on both literary and, especially, non-literary sources. Its size, over 1000 pages, prevents me of course from a detailed discussion. Yet I will try to give an impression of this impressive book, which is unequalled in its thoroughness