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Ingham of Arabia

A Collection of Articles Presented as a Tribute to the Career of Bruce Ingham

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Edited by Clive Holes and Rudolf de Jong

Ingham of Arabia is a collection of twelve articles on modern Arabic dialectology contributed by an international collection of colleagues and pupils of Professor Ingham of the London School of Oriental and African Languages on the occasion of his retirement. Half the articles are concerned with Arabic dialects from the areas Prof Ingham spent his academic life researching, principally Arabia and the neighbouring areas: Oman, Jordan, Sinai, the Negev, southern Turkey, Syria. Other articles are concerned with general topics in Arabic dialectology. The book contains a complete bibliography of Professor Ingham's publications.

Omani Mehri

A New Grammar with Texts

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Aaron D. Rubin

This book contains a comprehensive grammatical description of Mehri, an unwritten Semitic language spoken in the Dhofar region of Oman, along with a corpus of more than one hundred texts. Topics in phonology, all aspects of morphology, and a variety of syntactic features are covered. The texts, presented with extensive commentary, were collected by the late T.M. Johnstone. Some are published here for the first time, while the rest have been newly edited and translated, based on the original manuscripts. Semitists, linguists, and anyone interested in the folklore of southern Arabia will find much valuable data and analysis in this volume, which is the most detailed grammatical study of a Modern South Arabian language yet published.

Series:

Aaron D. Rubin

or aspect. It can be used as a general, habitual, or immediate present; a habitual past; a future; a present or past progressive; or a circumstantial complement. This suggests that the imperfect is basically an imperfective, indicating incomplete action. However, the imperfect can also function as a

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Aaron D. Rubin

(published as Johnstone 1975b) was significant in the field of Semitics. The above having been said, the glottalic articulation of the “glottalic” consonants is not always present. Their consistent articulation as glottalics is not quite as evident as, say, in Amharic. Johnstone (1975a: 6) makes two

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Aaron D. Rubin

linguistic, a number of poetic texts are included, along with some linguistic commentary. Liebhaber has also published a separate edition of some of the poetic texts he has collected (2011a). 16 In that edition, his texts are presented both in Roman transcription and in a modified Arabic script. Though this

Series:

Aaron D. Rubin

rely in some cases on the paradigms found in ML . Occasional data from the fieldwork of Sabrina Bendjaballah, Julien Dufour, and Philippe Ségéral were used for comparison. In many places, the forms presented here differ from those found in ML , which contains many errors; not all of those errors are

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Aaron D. Rubin

(§ 13.3): wǝlākan ǝtēm, ǝl ǝḥād yǝḳáwdǝr līkǝm lā ‘but you, no one can beat you’ (73:12) hōh ǝl šay ar ðōmǝh ‘I have only this’ (73:5) An independent pronoun can also be used to clarify a direct object suffix, or it can function as an object in cases where no verb is present: ksǝ́ki, hōh w-arībēy, ðǝ

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Aaron D. Rubin

is gemination of the initial consonant. In practice, however, the gemination is very often not realized, in which case the article is then not present at all (or, one could say that it has the surface form Ø ). For example, the definite form of tēṯ ‘woman’ can be simply tēṯ , or it can be ttēṯ

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Aaron D. Rubin

copies). One text (106) is based only on an audio recording. There are very many differences between the texts printed herein and those printed in Stroomer (1999), and most of these differences are presented without comment. Many reflect the correction of errors, but others are due to the fact that

Coastal Dhofari Arabic

A Sketch Grammar

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Richard Davey

In Coastal Dhofari Arabic: A Sketch Grammar, Richard Davey provides a detailed description of a hitherto neglected Arabic dialect found in southern Oman. Previously recorded by Rhodokanakis, as part of the südarabische Expedition of the Austrian Imperial Academy, the dialect presented here offers a specific account of the day-to-day language spoken by the historical sedentary, coastal community.

Using data collected during 2010-2012, Richard Davey delivers an overview of the phonology, morphology and syntax of this variety. In addition to this, a lexicon of coastal Dhofari Arabic is provided, along with a discussion of its grammaticalized features. It is a timely account of a dialect that is endangered due to development, modernization, and the resulting social changes in Dhofar.