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Reflections on Law and Armed Conflicts

The Selected Works on the Laws of War by the late Professor Colonel G.I.A.C. Draper, OBE

Edited by Hilaire McCoubrey and Michael A. Meyer

This unique volume presents an edited selection of works upon the laws of armed conflict by the late Professor Colonel G. I. A. D. Draper, OBE. Professor Colonel Draper was a central figure in the analysis and dissemination of the humanitarian laws of armed conflict in the English-speaking world. He had a wide practical and academic experience of the subject including service as a prosecutor at the Nuremberg trials. His work covered not only the contemporary substance of the law but also its moral, ethical and political context, the pressures upon its development and its potential for further positive, and other, development.
This edited collection presents a very significant part of Professor Colonel Draper’s work, including many pieces which are no longer readily accessible or have never before been published, with modern commentary referring to developments which have occurred since his death. The late Professor Colonel’s work is an important scholarly contribution to the subject and also retains a very great degree of modern relevance, including comment upon such issues as war crimes and appropriate responses to them. The Editors present this collection as both an important scholarly and practical resource and a fitting tribute to one of the great twentieth century contributors to this area of law.

Douglas Johnston and W. Michael Reisman

In The Historical Foundations of World Order: the Tower and the Arena, Douglas M. Johnston has drawn on a 45 year career as one of the world’s most prolific academics in the development of international law and public policy and 5 years of exhaustive research to produce a comprehensive and highly nuanced examination of the historical precursors, intellectual developments, and philosophical frameworks that have guided the progress of world order through recorded history and across the globe, from pre-classical antiquity to the present day. By illuminating the personalities and identifying the controversies behind the great advancements in international legal thought and weaving this into the context of more conventionally known history, Johnston presents a unique understanding of how peoples and nations have sought regularity, justice and order across the ages. This book will appeal to a wide spectrum of readers, from lawyers interested in the historical background of familiar concepts, to curriculum developers for law schools and history faculties, to general interest readers wanting a wider perspective on the history of civilization.

Winner 2009 ASIL Certificate of Merit for a Preeminent Contribution to Creative Scholarship

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Edited by Abdulqawi A. Yusuf

The African Yearbook of International Law provides an intellectual forum for the systematic analysis and scientific dissection of issues of international law as they apply to Africa, as well as Africa's contribution to the progressive development of international law. It contributes to the promotion, acceptance of and respect for the principles of international law, as well as to the encouragement of the teaching, study, dissemination and wider appreciations of international law in Africa. A clear articulation of Africa's views on the various aspects of international law based on the present realities of the continent as well as on Africa's civilization, culture, philosophy and history will undoubtedly contribute to a better understanding among nations.
The African Yearbook of International Law plays an important role in examining the tensions underlying the State in Africa, and by shedding more light on the causes of the fragility of African State institutions so as to facilitate the identification of appropriate remedies. The tension and interrelationships among issues such as territorial integrity, self determination, ethnic diversity and nation-building are constantly addressed. Development, human rights and democratization in Africa are also the subject of continuous attention and examination.
The Special Theme of this volume is `Human Rights and Development in Africa'.

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Edited by Kevin Kennedy

This volume provides practitioners, academics and students with the first definitive coverage of NAFTA investment arbitration. Given the level of foreign direct investment within the NAFTA countries, the issue of redress for states in investment cases is a major one. The state dispute settlement mechanisms within NAFTAs Chapter Eleven are recognized as a model worthy of close examination.



The experts and scholars who have contributed to this work present a comprehensive overview of the first ten years of practice in the area of investment disputes under the NAFTA provision. As in any nascent undertaking, the successes, failures and controversies that have been the experience of the state parties involved in NAFTA, are keenly reflected in the Chapter 11 cases. It is in these experiences, as described by in the chapters of this timely volume, that the readers will find substantive and procedural insights into an emerging new area of public international economic law. Many see the workings of the NAFTA agreement, particularly Chapter 11, as a Rorschach test for how state parties can approach and effectively adjudicate investment disputes. For this reason all practitioners and scholars concerned with international trade and foreign direct investment issues should consult this book.



Published under the Transnational Publishers imprint.

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Edited by Abdulqawi A. Yusuf

The African Yearbook of International Law provides an intellectual forum for the systematic analysis and scientific dissection of issues of international law as they apply to Africa, as well as Africa’s contribution to the progressive development of international law. It contributes to the promotion, acceptance of and respect for the principles of international law, as well as to the encouragement of the teaching, study, dissemination and wider appreciation of international law in Africa. A clear articulation of Africa’s views on the various aspects of international law based on the present realities of the continent as well as on Africa’s civilization, culture, philosophy and history will undoubtedly contribute to a better understanding among nations.
The African Yearbook of International Law plays an important role in examining the tensions underlying the State in Africa, and by shedding more light on the causes of the fragility of African state institutions so as to facilitate the identification of appropriate remedies. The tension and interrelationships among issues such as territorial integrity, self determination, ethnic diversity and nation-building are constantly addressed. Development, human rights and democratization in Africa are also subject of continuous attention and examination.

Grotiana

A Journal published under the auspices of the Grotiana Foundation

Editor-in-Chief Hans Blom and Mark Somos

Grotiana appears under the auspices of the Grotiana Foundation. The journal’s leading objective is the furtherance of the Grotian tradition. It welcomes any relevant contribution to a better understanding of Grotius’ life and works. At the same time close attention will be paid to Grotius’ relevance for present-day thinking about world problems. Grotiana therefore intends to be a forum for exchanges concerning the philosophical, ethical and legal fundamentals of the search for an international order.

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Edited by Abdulqawi A. Yusuf

The African Yearbook of International Law provides an intellectual forum for the systematic analysis and scientific dissection of issues of international law as they apply to Africa, as well as Africa's contribution to the progressive development of international law. It contributes to the promotion, acceptance of and respect for the principles of international law, as well as to the encouragement of the teaching, study, dissemination and wider appreciations of international law in Africa. A clear articulation of Africa's views on the various aspects of international law based on the present realities of the continent as well as on Africa's civilization, culture, philosophy and history will undoubtedly contribute to a better understanding among nations.
The African Yearbook of International Law plays an important role in examining the tensions underlying the State in Africa, and by shedding more light on the causes of the fragility of African State institutions so as to facilitate the identification of appropriate remedies. The tension and interrelationships among issues such as territorial integrity, self determination, ethnic diversity and nation-building are constantly addressed. Development, human rights and democratization in Africa are also the subject of continuous attention and examination.
The structure of the first two volumes - consisting of a special theme, individual articles, notes and comments, book reviews and basic documents - will be reflected to the extent possible in future volumes, but will also be constantly improved with the addition of new features and areas of study.
The African Yearbook of International Law will attract more contributions in the future from African international lawyers currently teaching or practising in Africa. Most of those who have toiled to make the first volume a reality are now working outside the continent. They are, however, all determined to see to it that this intellectual forum will serve first and foremost the teachers and practitioners of international law in Africa.

Hugo Grotius Mare Liberum 1609-2009

Original Latin Text and English Translation

Robert Feenstra

The quadricentenary of Hugo Grotius’ Mare liberum (1609-2009) offered the opportunity to publish a reliable critical edition – combined with a revised English translation – of Grotius’ first publication in the field of international law.
Starting from a comparison with the autographic manuscript, Robert Feenstra undertook a verification of the text of the first and only authorised edition – in particular of the numerous marginal references – resulting in many corrections and further annotations. In his ‘Editor’s Introduction’, he explains the history of the later editions of the Latin text and the translations of Mare liberum. Jeroen Vervliet’s ‘General Introduction’ aims at providing a better understanding of the circumstances in which Hugo Grotius wrote this work; it elucidates the legal argument used by Grotius, and the reaction of his contemporary opponents.

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Edited by Helen Durham and Timothy L.H. McCormack

It is indisputable that the way armed conflict is conducted has changed dramatically in the last half of the twentieth century. The contributions to this volume accept the reality of these changes and seek to assess the efficacy of certain aspects of international humanitarian law. The volume commences with a critical evaluation of the 1977 Protocols additional to the four Geneva Conventions of 1949. Subsequent chapters consider increasing protection for women and minorities in armed conflict; efforts to control the weapons of war; identifying the law applicable to peace operations; and current developments in the enforcement of international humanitarian law. One general theme which emerges from a number of chapters is the importance of the relationship between international humanitarian law and other relevant areas of international law. Most of the contributors also applaud recent developments towards effective enforcement of the established principles of this important area of international law.

The long journey of ‘Privatautonomie’

The history of a concept coined and exported in times of persecution

Arndt Kiehnle

would come close to the present, not entirely clarified, concept of public autonomy or self-government. Is the political sphere abandoned when Sophocles (probably 497-406 BC) lets his heroine Antigone die ‘autonomously’? It is difficult to deny that here it is about the autonomy of an individual, even