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Edited by Brian Grim, Todd M. Johnson, Vegard Skirbekk and Gina Zurlo

The Yearbook of International Religious Demography presents an annual snapshot of the state of religious statistics around the world. Every year large amounts of data are collected through censuses, surveys, polls, religious communities, scholars, and a host of other sources. These data are collated and analyzed by research centers and scholars around the world. Large amounts of data appear in analyzed form in the World Religion Database (Brill), aiming at a researcher’s audience. The Yearbook presents data in sets of tables and scholarly articles spanning social science, demography, history, and geography. Each issue offers findings, sources, methods, and implications surrounding international religious demography. Each year an assessment is made of new data made available since the previous issue of the yearbook.

Contributors are: Todd Johnson, Gina Zurlo, Peter Crossing, Juan Cruz Esquivel, Fortunato Mallimaci, Annalisa Butticci, Brian Grim, Philip Connor, Ken Chitwood, Vegard Skirbekk, Marcin Stonawski, Rodrigo Franklin de Sousa, Davis Brown, Juan Carlos Esparza Ochoa, and Maria Concepción Servín Nieto.

Series:

Marthe Hesselmans

of the new South Africa to bring equality. Their actions comprise only the most recent episode in the country’s ongoing struggle to come to terms with the racial divisions of both the past and the present. It returns to the violently crushed Soweto Uprising in 1976 in which students protested against

Series:

Marthe Hesselmans

past and present inequities, but nonetheless appear in relative proximity, especially in comparison with the other population groups present within the Reformed family. It is therefore all the more remarkable that the Cape’s Reformed family continues to be organized largely along the lines of the old

Series:

Marthe Hesselmans

issues to tie together people with divergent backgrounds and ideas, if only for one moment of joint prayer. Among the Reformed churches, this use of liturgy emerged frequently as a key strategy to help deal with their past and present divisions. It surfaced in organizational meetings where leaders tried

Africa in Scotland, Scotland in Africa

Historical Legacies and Contemporary Hybridities

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Edited by Afe Adogame and Andrew Lawrence

Africa in Scotland, Scotland in Africa provides scholarly, interdisciplinary analysis of the historical and contemporary relationships, links and networks between Scotland, Africa and the African diaspora. The book interrogates these links from a variety of perspectives – historical, political, economic, religious, diplomatic, and cultural – and assesses the mutual implications for past, present and future relationships. The socio-historical connection between Scotland and Africa is illuminated by the many who have shaped the history of African nationalism, education, health, and art in respective contexts of Africa, Britain, the Caribbean and the USA. The book contributes to the empirical, theoretical and methodological development of European African Studies, and thus fills a significant gap in information, interpretation and analysis of the specific historical and contemporary relationships between Scotland, Africa and the African diaspora.

Contributors are: Afe Adogame, Andrew Lawrence, Esther Breitenbach, John McCracken, Markku Hokkanen, Olutayo Charles Adesina, Marika Sherwood, Caroline Bressey, Janice McLean, Everlyn Nicodemus, Kristian Romare, Oluwakemi Adesina, Elijah Obinna, Damaris Seleina Parsitau, Kweku Michael Okyerefo, Musa Gaiya and Jordan Rengshwat, Vicky Khasandi-Telewa, Kenneth Ross, Magnus Echtler, and Geoff Palmer.

Series:

Marthe Hesselmans

passed on to future generations. In South Africa, churches have for decades served as sanctuaries for particular identity groups, the only place relatively safe from the regime. Religious, ethnic and racial identities are profoundly intertwined here, presenting severe challenges for a church family that

Series:

Marthe Hesselmans

was added to the other three confessions that had until then formed the religious foundation of Reformed churches worldwide, with the most recent one dating as far back as the sixteen hundreds. Making Belhar into a fourth confession thus presented a powerful symbolic move through which the mission

Series:

Marthe Hesselmans

contested here. It implies hope for more cohesion among communities torn by an apartheid past and disparate present. Concretely, it has become associated with the visible unification of the black, white, colored and Indian sections by which the Reformed churches have remained separated. 5 The past two