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Back to the Present: Forward to the Past, Volume I

Irish Writing and History since 1798

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Edited by Patricia A. Lynch, Joachim Fischer and Brian Coates

The island of Ireland, north and south, has produced a great diversity of writing in both English and Irish for hundreds of years, often using the memories embodied in its competing views of history as a fruitful source of literary inspiration. Placing Irish literature in an international context, these two volumes explore the connection between Irish history and literature, in particular the Rebellion of 1798, in a more comprehensive, diverse and multi-faceted way than has often been the case in the past. The fifty-three authors bring their national and personal viewpoints as well as their critical judgements to bear on Irish literature in these stimulating articles. The contributions also deal with topics such as Gothic literature, ideology, and identity, as well as gender issues, connections with the other arts, regional Irish literature, in particular that of the city of Limerick, translations, the works of Joyce, and comparisons with the literature of other nations. The contributors are all members of IASIL (International Association for the Study of Irish Literatures). Back to the Present: Forward to the Past. Irish Writing and History since 1798 will be of interest to both literary scholars and professional historians, but also to the general student of Irish writing and Irish culture.

The French Nonprofit Sector

A Literature Review

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Laura Nirello and Lionel Prouteau

This article deals with the literature on the French nonprofit sector (NPS). A preliminary part is devoted to presenting and discussing the characteristics that shape the approaches to this sector in France. We stress the strong influence of legal categories on the sector’s definition and, in this context, the importance of the status inherited from the 1901 Act on contracts of association. This raises a problem for a more analytical approach to the sector, because the diversity of the nonprofit organizations (NPOs) regulated under this Act risks being overshadowed. In this first part, we also underline the primacy accorded in France to the concept of the social economy, which has today become the social and solidarity economy (SSE), over that of the nonprofit sector.
In the second part, the article outlines some landmarks in the history of the French NPS. French NPOs were for many years objects of suspicion, arbitrariness and repression on the part of the public authorities and this persisted until the 1901 legislation on contracts of association was enacted. However, this hostile context did not prevent the sector from having a richer existence than is sometimes admitted.
This literature review also focuses on empirical studies of the sector, placing a particular emphasis on the more recent ones. These French studies basically adopt two types of approach. The first is concerned essentially with the NPOs and focuses its attention on their economic importance, whether measured in terms of financial resources, employment, or, less frequently, added value. The second approach investigates the kinds of individual participation the sector engenders by examining the various forms it takes, such as membership of NPOs or voluntary work.
This review ends with the analysis of the challenges that NPS faces in a context characterized by the increasing constraints on public funding, changes in the nature of such funding with a substitution of contracts for subsidies, an increased competition among NPOs as well as between NPOs and for-profit enterprises. The article concludes that, despite the advances in research on the French NPS, some aspects—like formal volunteering and the role of voluntary associations—are still understudied, while others—like informal groups and informal volunteering—are almost totally ignored.

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Edited by Paul Pelckmans

Les Fables de La Fontaine multiplient les échos savamment aménagés. Le présent recueil voudrait souligner qu’elles aménagent aussi toute une intertextualité interne: les douze Livres regroupent des textes qui avaient déjà circulé séparément et dont la mise en série, même si elle ne débouche sur aucune structure globale du recueil, crée quelquefois des irisations assez paradoxales. Les études ici rassemblées cherchent à définir les critères qui permettent de reconnaître ces sériages, que La Fontaine souligne rarement pour laisser à la sagacité du lecteur le plaisir de les repérer. On voudrait montrer aussi que certaines fables très connues prennent, à la faveur de ces voisinages, une couleur fort inattendue.

La Fontaine’s Fables cultivate a sophisticated art of subtle echoes. They also set up occasionally a discreet internal intertextuality: the twelve Books of the definitive edition group texts that had already circulated separately and create somewhere brief series with very surprising iridescences. The author’s of the present essays search to define benchmarks that may allow to recognize this series: La Fontaine mostly preferred not to stress them explicitly, it should be the reader’s pleasure to locate them! The essays show also that some very well-known fables present, when read in combination with their neighbour-texts, a completely unexpected physiognomy.

Avec les contributions de / contributors: Julien Bardot, Patrick Dandrey, Marc Escola, Sjef Houppermans, Yves Lepestipon, Paul.J.Smith, Tiphaine Rolland

Neo-Victorian Tropes of Trauma

The Politics of Bearing After-Witness to Nineteenth-Century Suffering

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Edited by Marie-Luise Kohlke and Christian Gutleben

This collection constitutes the first volume in Rodopi’s Neo-Victorian Series, which explores the prevalent but often problematic re-vision of the long nineteenth century in contemporary culture. Here is presented for the first time an extended analysis of the conjunction of neo-Victorian fiction and trauma discourse, highlighting the significant interventions in collective memory staged by the belated aesthetic working-through of historical catastrophes, as well as their lingering traces in the present. The neo-Victorian’s privileging of marginalised voices and its contestation of master-narratives of historical progress construct a patchwork of competing but equally legitimate versions of the past, highlighting on-going crises of existential extremity, truth and meaning, nationhood and subjectivity. This volume will be of interest to both researchers and students of the growing field of neo-Victorian studies, as well as scholars in memory studies, trauma theory, ethics, and heritage studies. It interrogates the ideological processes of commemoration and forgetting and queries how the suffering of cultural and temporal others should best be represented, so as to resist the temptations of exploitative appropriation and voyeuristic spectacle. Such precarious negotiations foreground a central paradox: the ethical imperative to bear after-witness to history’s silenced victims in the face of the potential unrepresentability of extreme suffering.

Edited by Geert Buelens, Hubert van den Berg, Günter Berghaus and Sascha Bru

Avant-Garde Critical Studies (founded in 1987) is a series for themed-anthologies and monographs on all aspects of avant-garde and avant-gardism in modern literature, theatre, music, visual and applied arts, architecture and design from the late nineteenth century to the present.

Our mission is to publish high quality research, through double peer reviewing, on specific trends in single arts, countries and regions, as well as comparative and interdisciplinary studies in the interrelation between the different arts as well as between the arts, social and political contexts and cultural life in the broadest sense and all its diversity.

All manuscripts will be subjected to a double peer review which is part of the acceptation process.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Masja Horn.

Edited by Geert Buelens, Hubert van den Berg, Günter Berghaus and Sascha Bru

Avant-Garde Critical Studies (founded in 1987) is a series for themed-anthologies and monographs on all aspects of avant-garde and avant-gardism in modern literature, theatre, music, visual and applied arts, architecture and design from the late nineteenth century to the present.

Our mission is to publish high quality research, through double peer reviewing, on specific trends in single arts, countries and regions, as well as comparative and interdisciplinary studies in the interrelation between the different arts as well as between the arts, social and political contexts and cultural life in the broadest sense and all its diversity.

All manuscripts will be subjected to a double peer review which is part of the acceptation process.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Masja Horn.

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Edited by Hazel Barnes

Drama for Life, University of the Witwatersrand, aims “to enhance the capacity of young people, theatre practitioners and their communities to take responsibility for the quality of their lives in the context of HIV and AIDS in Africa. We achieve this through participatory and experiential drama and theatre that is appropriate to current social realities but draws on the rich indigenous knowledge of African communities.”
Collected here is a representative set of research essays written to facilitate dialogue across disciplines on the role of drama and theatre in HIV/AIDS education, prevention, and rehabilitation. Reflections are offered on present praxis and the media, as well as on innovative research approaches in an interdisciplinary paradigm, along with HIV/AIDS education via performance poetry and other experimental methods such as participant-led workshops.
Topics include: the call for a move away from the binaries of much critical pedagogy; a project, undertaken in Ghana and Malawi with people living with AIDS, to create and present theatre; the contradictions between global and local expectations of applied drama and theatre methodology, in relation to folk media, participation, and syncretism. Three case studies report on mapping as a creative device for playmaking; the methodology of Themba Interactive Theatre; and applying drama with women living with HIV in the Zandspruit Informal Settlement.
The essays validate the importance of play in both energizing those in positions of hopelessness and enabling the distancing essential to observe one’s situation and enable change. The book stimulates the ongoing investigation of current practice and extends an invitation to further develop innovative approaches.

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Edited by Francesco Venturi

This volume investigates the various ways in which writers comment on, present, and defend their own works, and at the same time themselves, across early modern Europe. A multiplicity of self-commenting modes, ranging from annotations to explicatory prose to prefaces to separate critical texts and exemplifying a variety of literary genres, are subjected to analysis. Self-commentaries are more than just an external apparatus: they direct and control reception of the primary text, thus affecting notions of authorship and readership. With the writer understood as a potentially very influential and often tendentious interpreter of their own work, the essays in this collection offer new perspectives on pre-modern and modern forms of critical self-consciousness, self-representation, and self-validation.

Contributors are Harriet Archer, Gilles Bertheau, Carlo Caruso, Jeroen De Keyser, Russell Ganim, Joseph Harris, Ian Johnson, Richard Maber, Martin McLaughlin, John O’Brien, Magdalena Ożarska, Federica Pich, Brian Richardson, Els Stronks, and Colin Thompson.