Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 14 items for :

  • All: "presentism" x
  • Middle East and Islamic Studies x
  • Manuscripts & Printing x
  • Book History and Cartography x
  • Languages and Linguistics x
Clear All
Part 1: Université de Liège
The Catalogue of the Arabic, Persian and Turkish Manuscripts in Belgium is a union catalogue aiming is to present the Oriental manuscripts held by various Belgian public institutions (Royal Library, university and public libraries). These collections and their contents are largely unknown to scholars due to the lack of published catalogues. This first volume, consisting of a bi-lingual (English and Arabic) handlist, concerns the collection of the Université de Liège, which holds the largest number of Oriental manuscripts (c. 500). Each title is briefly described, identifying the author and offering basic material information. Most of the manuscripts described in this handlist originate from North Africa.
From the first Arabic grammar printed at Granada in 1505 to the Arabic editions of the Dutch scholar Thomas Erpenius (d.1624), some audacious scholars - supported by powerful patrons and inspired by several of the greatest minds of the Renaissance – introduced, for the first time, the study of Arabic language and letters to centres of learning across Europe. These pioneers formed collections of Arabic manuscripts, met Arabic-speaking visitors, studied and adapted the Islamic grammatical tradition, and printed editions of Arabic texts - most strikingly in the magnificent books published by the Medici Oriental Press at Rome in the 1590s. Robert Jones’ findings in the libraries of Florence, Leiden, Paris and Vienna, and his contribution to the history of grammar, are of enduring importance.

Assemani’s classifications are given. Where I have seen the manuscripts I have also given the present-day reclassifications. The GAL titles and authors are used as modern identifications for Raimondi’s and Assemani’s entries. The square-bracketed numbers refer to Raimondi’s original sequence

In: Learning Arabic in Renaissance Europe (1505-1624)

nature of the tense it describes, i.e. that of incompleted action, present or future. Postel’s futurum is distorting. Postel’s infinitivus for maṣdar suggests a function that maṣdar does not have, i.e. that of to do, make, be etc., the infinitive of European languages. His mazdar and

In: Learning Arabic in Renaissance Europe (1505-1624)

active and passive nomina; the infinitive/verbal noun ( maṣdar ), with one thousand four hundred and sixty-five examples of infinitives alphabetically arranged and giving the present stems in each case. These are termed muḍāriʿ , the incompleted action tense of Arabic grammar. The third chapter is on

In: Learning Arabic in Renaissance Europe (1505-1624)

difficulties of that script and noticing various lacunae Raimondi gave each word of the text a thorough grammatical analysis. The present purpose of this appendix is to edit those passages that illustrate Raimondi’s understanding of Arabic. The passages are particularly interesting as an example of what might

In: Learning Arabic in Renaissance Europe (1505-1624)

present passive; the Liber Tasriphi translations of these same Arabic verbs are in the Latin past passive. That death intervened to prevent the publication of Raimondi’s translation, as Erpenius says, is perfectly true. But it seems likely that Raimondi’s work on the manuscript had already been shelved

In: Learning Arabic in Renaissance Europe (1505-1624)

grammar writing presented the first Arabists with such a persistant challenge, both their published and unpublished work in this field provides an essential window on their relative abilities to overcome a common problem. During the European Renaissance, interest in and knowledge of a growing number of

In: Learning Arabic in Renaissance Europe (1505-1624)

taking any opportunity that presented itself at home; and there were those who travelled abroad to pursue their interest in Arabic – but not without considerable risk. It was not too much trouble for some of them to undertake lengthy, dangerous and costly journeys for its sake. Nicolaus Clenardus

In: Learning Arabic in Renaissance Europe (1505-1624)

unvowelled and thus without inflection. To know the inflection of a word through knowledge of the grammar of Arabic is to know how to read it in an unvowelled text. At the outset of his studies the student of Arabic will be fortunate if he is presented with a clear exposition on the script and pronunciation

In: Learning Arabic in Renaissance Europe (1505-1624)