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Fire over Luoyang

A History of the Later Han Dynasty 23-220 AD

Series:

Rafe de Crespigny

Winner of the 2017 Choice Outstanding Academic Title Award
The Later Han dynasty, also known as Eastern Han, ruled China for the first two centuries of the Christian era. Comparable in extent and power to the early Roman empire, it dominated east Asia from present-day Vietnam to the Mongolian steppe.
Rafe de Crespigny presents here the first full account of this period in Chinese history to be found in a Western language. Commencing with a detailed account of the imperial capital, the history describes the nature of government, the expansion of the Chinese people to the south, the conflicts of scholars and officials with eunuchs at court, and the final collapse which followed the rebellion of the Yellow Turbans and the rise of regional warlords.

Series:

Paul Bevan

publications. 13 The early examples in Shanghai manhua were not overtly political, only occasionally stressing themes of social comment. This was certainly also the case with the magazine as a whole which did not concentrate on political themes but presented articles and cartoons of both a political and

Series:

Paul Bevan

books are highly erudite, detailed accounts of the author’s visits to, and lengthy wanderings around, those cities presented in the form of non-stop guided tours. These travel books are notably different to the earlier short stories that had appealed to the Japanese in the early 1920s and the Chinese

Series:

Paul Bevan

, particularly that of Zhang Guangyu. However, much of the information included in these accounts is contradictory or otherwise inaccurate and it is only in the present study that the full extent of Covarrubias’s influence on the art and artists of Shanghai has been demonstrated. Not only was Covarrubias’s work

Series:

Paul Bevan

being to present a cross section of Chinese “revolutionary art” to the organisers. In the end, forty paintings, fifty-eight woodcuts and six sketches were shown. This exhibition is well documented and has been widely cited in studies about the New Woodcut Movement. 50 The differences between both these

Series:

Paul Bevan

previous day, the editors of the magazine being named as Cao Hanmei and Wang Dunqing. More than ninety reproductions of the exhibits are presented in this issue, including many of those that were singled out for praise by critics. Seventeen of those listed are reproduced in full-colour, nine in “three