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Beyond 'Presentism'

Re-imagining the Historical, Personal, and Social Places of Curriculum

Edited by James Nahachewsky and Ingrid Johnston

"Precisely titled, this powerful collection constitutes a “chronotope,” an erudite enactment of interstices within and among historical time, spiritual place, and political culture, a recollection focused forward to those “hybrid” generations (in Canadian classrooms) whose frontier is haunted by forts populated by not always their ancestors, inscribed in their national, regional, aboriginal identities. Homophobic, hygienic, the curriculum is always already inhabited by the language of the Other, propelling us toward “post-post” being, forested in difference, rooted in images, refracted through mirrors and windows. In constructing this crucial collage of decolonization, the contributors summon us to study with them the place we inhabit."

WILLIAM F. PINAR, Professor and Canada Research Chair,
Department of Curriculum and Pedagogy, University Of British Columbia, Canada

A Man Comes from Someplace

Stories, History, Memory from a Lost Time

Series:

Judith Pearl Summerfield

A Man Comes from Someplace: Stories, History, Memory from a Lost Time is a cultural study of a multi-generational Jewish family from a shtetl in southwestern Ukraine before World War I to their international lives in the 21st century. The narrative, told from multiple perspectives, becomes a transformative space for re-presenting family stories as cultural performance. The study draws from many sources: ethnographic interviews with an oral storyteller (the author’s father), family letters, papers from immigration and relief organizations of the 1920s, eyewitness reports, newspaper clippings, photographs, maps, genealogy, and cultural, historical, and literary research.
The book investigates the ways family stories can be collected, interpreted, and re-presented to situate story in history and to re-envision connections between the past, present, and future. Family stories become memory sites for interrogating questions of loss and displacement, exile, immigration, survival, resilience, and identity. Stories function as antidotes to trauma, a means of making sense of the world. Memory is an act of resistance, the refusal to be silenced or erased, the insistence that we know the past and remember those who came before.

International Conversations on Curriculum Studies

Subject, Society and Curriculum

Edited by Eero Ropo and Tero Autio

This collection of essays from the most prominent scholars in the field of curriculum studies paint an intellectually rich palette of the present state of curriculum research across the countries and continents when the traditionally prevailed national imaginaries give increasingly way to transnational, international, and postnational impulses. The main parameters of education, subjectivity and its belonging, is shifting by employing the contradictory and broader issues around the question of nation and nation-state as well as around its traditional educational counterpart, the psychologized individual, both radically reinterpreted by post- and rereadings of old educational and social canons. International Conversations on Curriculum identifies the present transformations at work nationwide, worldwide, between and beyond, by focusing on these shifts from a variety of methodological, theoretical, national, political, and pedagogic concerns. It will open new and, one could argue, compelling vistas for reconsidering the social and political mission and moral purpose of education policies, of curriculum theory and practice in the increasingly but unevenly connected world characterized by economic volatility, unfair trade, ethnic and religious conflicts, and growing social instability and collective existential insecurity. As such, the essays are a vital international testimony to the scholarly vibrancy and to the global awareness of the current intellectualized field of curriculum studies to alertly recognize and register the cultural, educational, and political urgencies of our times.

Edited by Pirkko Pitkänen and Devorah Kalekin-Fishman

Once a rare phenomenon, multiple state membership and multinational citizenship has become almost commonplace with the rise in transnational mobility. This compilation analyses transnational participation focusing mainly on the interests of individual people and their transnational networks. The focus lies on the perceptions, attitudes, experiences and views on membership and participation of people with dual/multiple citizenship and individuals with multinational background who hold a single citizenship. Eight contributions present findings from the international research project Dual Citizenship, Governance and Education: A Challenge to the European Nation-State (DCE) conducted in 2002-2006 in Britain, France, Portugal, Germany, Finland, Greece, Estonia, and Israel.

Symbolic Movement

Critique and Spirituality in Sociology of Education

Series:

Philip Wexler

This is a book about sociology of education—past, present and future.
In the first section the author chronicles and specifies the changes in the field, in a reflexive sociology of education, tracing the path out of liberalism, through radicalism and postmodernism, to an emergent new age stance in understanding education in society. Section two looks in more detail how these movements have actually worked in education and society.
The third section places the historical, macrosocial analysis of education and society on the smaller, more everyday screen of school life. Based on the author’s studies in high school, the question of identity and education is the fulcrum for a series of concrete studies or school portraits, which connect public social change and more personal, everyday life and identity with the social process of schooling.
The final section probes the new age theme. Questions of spirituality, rationality, magic, mysticism and sublimation are related to changes both in education and in sociology of education. What does it mean to do educational research in a re-sacralized, mystical society? And, does a new theory of sociology of education emerge on a Weberian rather than Durkheimian-functionalist or Marxist-radical view of the directions and reversals that begin in modernity and become more evident in our times?

Challenges Bequeathed

Taking up the challenges of Dwayne Huebner

Series:

Edited by Patrick J. Lewis and Jennifer Tupper

In this thoughtful and provocative collection of essays, a group of scholars from varied backgrounds and interests have each taken up the educational challenges bequeathed by Dwayne Huebner in his 1996 essay, “Challenges Bequeathed”.
Huebner encouraged educators to surpass the technical foundations of education, affirm the significance of the imagination, use the world’s intellectual traditions and achievements, engage in public discourse about education, and speak out for children and youth. Each author has extended, and in some ways transcended, the discussion of these five challenges yet still draw upon the considerable contribution Dwayne Huebner has made to the field of education.
The writers in this volume grapple with the complexities of teaching and learning as always in process and as always relational; of schools as sites of creative and imaginative acts of knowing and being.
The book begins with Huebner’s 1996 essay wherein he delineates the challenges for educators, as he perceived them. Readers are invited to begin with this chapter. However, after taking in Professor Huebner’s “prescience, his ability to see, years in advance of everyone else, what is deeply at work in present times, where it is headed, and what needs to be done about it…” (Smith, this volume) we encourage readers to dip into this volume randomly rather than in sequential order. While doing so, it is important to be mindful that “these challenges do not exist in isolation of each other; rather they are inextricably linked in myriad ways. Each one of these challenges requires consideration of classroom spaces, the individuals who occupy these spaces, and how these spaces are influenced by external forces” (Tupper, this volume).
We invite you to take up a challenge.

Series:

Panayiotis Antoniou, Bert P. M. Creemers and Leonidas Kyriakides

This chapter is concerned with research on teacher professional development addressing the effectiveness of different approaches that can be used to improve the quality of teaching. The two main strands of research in teacher education are presented and their strengths and weaknesses are discussed. One is concerned with the focus of teacher education on the development of specific competences and the other with the provision of a more holistic approach encouraging reflection on experiences and beliefs. It is shown that none of them is validated substantially and questions about the relation between the uses of each of these approaches in relation to quality of teaching can be raised. It also is argued that teacher professional development has to be related with teacher effectiveness research. Thus, this chapter shows how findings of research on teacher professional development can be integrated with validated theoretical models of educational effectiveness. Specifically, we discuss the extent to which the dynamic model of educational effectiveness can be used in order to help teachers improve their knowledge and skills and ultimately their effectiveness. To support the use of a theory-driven and evidence based approach to teacher professional development, empirical evidence about the importance of teacher factors taken into account for the development of this approach is presented and suggestions for research and practice in teacher professional development are provided.

Series:

Gregory M. Hauser and Dennis W. Koutouzos

Computer use has changed schools dramatically—from the delivery of instruction to our understanding of what constitutes a school. Current technological trends suggest that changes such as these will increase as technology changes, which raises the question of whether school leaders are prepared to provide the proactive leadership necessary to American education. This chapter provides an overview of present and anticipated use of technology by school leaders and a description of current and emerging pedagogical approaches associated with the preparation of school leaders in the use of technology. The chapter is organized into three key sections: Current and Anticipated Uses of Technology, Current and Emerging Practices in Preparing School Leaders, and Implications and Recommendations for the Future.

Triple Helix

A Journal of University-Industry-Government Innovation and Entrepreneurship

Editor-in-Chief Henry Etzkowitz

The Triple Helix of university-industry-government relations is an internationally recognized model for understanding entrepreneurship, the changing dynamics of universities, innovation and socio-economic development.

The aim of the journal is to publish research for an international audience covering analysis, theory, measurements and empirical enquiry in all aspects of university-industry-government interactions. The objective is to unite key research on the transformations of universities, capitalization of knowledge, translational research, spin-off activities, intellectual property, knowledge and technology transfer, as well as the international bases and dimensions of Triple Helix relations, their impacts, social, economic, political, cultural, health and environmental implications as they arise from and shape Triple Helix interactions.

Open to all innovation authors, the special mission of the journal is to be an international outlet also for innovation scholars from developing countries.

Education and the Spirit of Time

Historical, Global and Critical Reflections

Series:

Edited by Olli-Pekka Moisio and Juha Suoranta

The aim of this book is to raise current social, political, and moral issues in social theory by taking a critical stance towards historical, global, and educational themes in the context of culture, politics, and technology. All the contributors have written their texts in the spirit of critical Zeitgeist analysis, which, they believe, is a highly needed genre in social theory. Thus the focus of the book is critical Zeitgeist analysis, and its potential in addressing various social maladies of the present era. Methodologically, critical Zeitgeist analysis is argued to be of value in demonstrating how to both utilize and expand the possibilities of writing normative social theory. The key idea of critical Zeitgeist analysis is to reflect critically on the state of the present world. In this task it entwines analytical, political and moral languages, as well as the languages of critique and hope. In critical Zeitgeist analysis it is not only possible but also necessary to ask who we are, and what states of affairs prevail in our tragic times. The themes of the book are global and it can be used as a course book in several fields of social science like cultural studies, education and political science, as well as in sociology.