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Symbolic Power in Cultural Contexts

Uncovering Social Reality

Edited by Jarmo Houtsonen and Ari Antikainen

Culture and power are among the most passionately argued concepts and ideas in the field of social sciences. In this book the relation between culture and power is examined through the concept of symbolic power. The essays in this multifaceted book examine the past and present forms of symbolic power in different geographical contexts, institutions and fields of social action.
The book is organized into four major parts. The first part, Symbolic (Mis)representations of Reality, focuses on the concept of symbolic power, classification as a strategy of symbolic manipulation, the authority of first person narration, and the emergence of the “precariat” in metropolises. The second part, Transforming State, Education and Childhood, deals with the profound changes in the European welfare state and its relation to childhood, and educational systems. The third part, Cultures and Agency in Changing Contexts, sheds light on the minority language issues in Europe, the position of young female immigrants in Israeli religious schools, the prevailing Chinese culture that prefers sons to daughters, the Finnish fashion industry in a global squeeze, and Australian sense of dwelling place and habitus. The final part, Emerging Identities of Intellectuals in Globalizing World, examines the nature and characteristics of intellectuals in India, the meeting of the Occident and the Orient in Tangier at the beginning of the 20th century, and the potential significance of the highly educated diaspora for socio-economic development.
The writers are internationally renowned social scientists from three continents. Editors Jarmo Houtsonen and Ari Antikainen work at the Department of Sociology at the University of Joensuu in Finland.
This book is dedicated to professor M’hammed Sabour.

A Man Comes from Someplace

Stories, History, Memory from a Lost Time

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Judith Pearl Summerfield

A Man Comes from Someplace: Stories, History, Memory from a Lost Time is a cultural study of a multi-generational Jewish family from a shtetl in southwestern Ukraine before World War I to their international lives in the 21st century. The narrative, told from multiple perspectives, becomes a transformative space for re-presenting family stories as cultural performance. The study draws from many sources: ethnographic interviews with an oral storyteller (the author’s father), family letters, papers from immigration and relief organizations of the 1920s, eyewitness reports, newspaper clippings, photographs, maps, genealogy, and cultural, historical, and literary research.
The book investigates the ways family stories can be collected, interpreted, and re-presented to situate story in history and to re-envision connections between the past, present, and future. Family stories become memory sites for interrogating questions of loss and displacement, exile, immigration, survival, resilience, and identity. Stories function as antidotes to trauma, a means of making sense of the world. Memory is an act of resistance, the refusal to be silenced or erased, the insistence that we know the past and remember those who came before.

The Civic Gospel

A Political Cartography of Christianity

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William M. Reynolds and Julie A. Webber

This book is a result of the times in which we are living. These times demand a response. When the authors began to write this book, it was not popular to dissent against the Bush administration. In fact, dissent was and still is equated with terrorism. Now, it might seem that the tide is turning and maybe after the 2008 election some of this nightmare we have been experiencing will change. At least that is the optimistic view. But there are small traces that the struggle the authors discuss in this book will continue well into the 21st century.
The intermingling of the political and the religious is still swirling in the present context. The Civic Gospel, as the authors discuss it, is the notion that preaching the Gospel is preaching politics and vise versa. This book is about that struggle and the issues related to it.

The Ethics of Caring

Bridging Pedagogy and Utopia

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Tammy A. Shel

In a cold and heartless world, Tammy Shel’s The Ethics of Caring demonstrates that teaching can and should involve care for the student and a pedagogy of caring at the core of education. Combining philosophy with ethnography, Shel examines the definition of caring through the voices of five case studies of five teachers. The book demonstrates that despite the challenges they cope with, teachers can still make a difference in students’ lives and in society, by doing more than teach for the test. The book makes a significant contribution to the promotion of the ethics of caring in education and for humanity’s welfare.
Douglas Kellner
George F. Kneller Chair in the Philosophy of Education, UCLA
Tammy Shel’s study presented in this powerful book adds important dimensions to the understanding of "caring" in classrooms. Furthermore, the narrative and analysis of teachers, teaching, students, learning, and the contexts of schooling and communities provide for a deep theoretical and practical discussion of pedagogy vis-a-vis the larger purposes of education. The discussions of "caring, " as enacted in these cases, are a solid and sophisticated contribution to further comprehend its complexity and challenges, as well as an addition to the literature in the field. This book is a must read for students of teaching, for experienced practitioners, and for teacher educators who are interested in a humanistic, caring, and just education.
Jaime Grinberg
Professor, Educational Foundations, Montclair State University

A Soul has no Gender

Love and acceptance through the eyes of a mother of sexual and gender minority children

Series:

Denise M. Ajeto

What would you do if your child told you that he or she had something “very difficult” to tell you? How would you respond? Would you sit down and try to understand what your child was trying to communicate to you? Would you respond in anger, judgment, or irritation? Would you even give your child your full attention? And after listening to your child, would you attempt to ignore, dismiss, or even deny what your child was trying to tell you?
These are important questions for all parents to ask—and answer—because it is vitally important that parents understand how to respond to the significant questions that our children present to us with care and consideration. This understanding is especially critical for parents who are faced with the additional—and unexpected—challenge of how to respond when what is so “very difficult” for their child to tell them is that he or she is lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or questioning their identity (LGBTQ).
Given the strong societal stigma against the LGBTQ population, as well as the lack of education with respect to parenting skills, sexuality, gender, and identity development, many parents feel overwhelmed, ashamed, and isolated. As a result, despite coming out in increasing numbers, almost half of LGBTQ youth face an uncertain future due to parental and societal rejection.
A Soul Has No Gender is the story of one mother’s inquiry into her experience of coming to accept the sexual and gender identities of her fraternal twins, who are lesbian and female-to-male transgender, and how the experience transformed not only her relationships with her children, but with herself as well.

Michael Baizerman

Herein are presented the generalizations, aphorisms, provisional truths, and possible principles of practice extracted from three international meetings on Youth Work in Contested Spaces, the papers in this text, and the larger literature. Included are the same topics used to order the questions in the Introduction: Contested Spaces, doing youthwork, teaching and training, youth policy, research and evaluation, and youthworkers as persons and worker.

Muslim Voices in School

Narratives of Identity and Pluralism

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Edited by Özlem Sensoy and Christopher Darius Stonebanks

This book is a collection of readable, accessible, compelling, varied, voiced, passionate, real, textured, multi-faceted, hybrid, fearless, fearful, cautious, bold, modest, and inspired accounts of living Islam in relation to mainstream schooling in the West.
The book helps to make the diverse experiences of Muslim students (from elementary through university, student through professor) both contextual and complex. The politics and education about Islam, Muslims, Arabs, Turks, Iranians and all that is associated with the West’s popular imagination of the monolithic “Middle-East” has long been framed within problematics. The goal of this book is to push back against the reductive mainstream narratives told about Muslim and Middle Eastern heritage students for generations if not centuries, in mainstream schools. The chapters are each authored by Muslim-acculturated scholars.
This book will be of interest to teachers, administrators, students and scholars. As well, the content is suited to fields of study including ethnic studies, critical multicultural education, anti-oppression approaches to education, curriculum studies, social issues in education, social contexts of education, and qualitative research in education.
WINNER! of the National Association for Multicultural Education’s 2010 Philip C. Chinn book award!

Global Citizenship Education

Philosophy, Theory and Pedagogy

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Edited by Michael A. Peters, Alan Britton and Harry Blee

The essays in this edited collection argue that global citizenship education realistically must be set against the imperfections of our contemporary political realities. As a form of education it must actively engage in a critically informed way with a set of complex inherited historical issues that emerge out of a colonial past and the savage globalization which often perpetuates unequal power relations or cause new inequalities. The essays in the book explore these issues and the emergent world ideologies of globalism, as well as present territorial conflicts, ethnic, tribal and nationalist rivalries, problems of increasing international migration and asylum, growing regional imbalances and increasing world inequalities. Contributors to this collection, each on their own way, argues that global citizenship education needs to project new values, to reality test and debate the language, concepts and theories of global citizenship and the proto-world institutions that seek to give expression to nascent aspirations for international forms of social justice and citizen participation in world government. Many of the contributors argue that global citizenship education offers the prospect of extending the liberal ideologies of human rights and multiculturalism, and of developing a better understanding of forms of post-colonialism. One thing is sure, as the essays presented in this book demonstrate so clearly, there can be no one dominant notion of global citizenship education as notions of ‘global’, ‘citizenship’ and ‘education’ are all contested and open to further argument and revision. Global citizenship education does not name the moment of global citizenship or even its emergence so much as the hope of a form of order where the rights of the individual and of cultural groups, irrespective of race, gender, ethnicity or creed, are observed, preserved and protected by all governments in order to become the basis of citizen participation in new global spaces that we might be tempted to call global civil society.

Looking Back and Living Forward

Indigenous Research Rising Up

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Edited by Jennifer Markides and Laura Forsythe

Looking Back and Living Forward: Indigenous Research Rising Up brings together research from a diverse group of scholars from a variety of disciplines. The work shared in this book is done by and with Indigenous peoples, from across Canada and around the world. Together, the collaborators’ voices resonate with urgency and insights towards resistance and resurgence.

The various chapters address historical legacies, environmental concerns, community needs, wisdom teachings, legal issues, personal journeys, educational implications, and more. In these offerings, the contributors share the findings from their literature surveys, document analyses, community-based projects, self-studies, and work with knowledge keepers and elders. The scholarship draws on the teachings of the past, experiences of the present, and will undoubtedly inform research to come.

Towards Globo Sapiens

Transforming Learners in Higher Education

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Patricia Kelly

Global and local studies show that the present growth-based approach to development is unsustainable. If we are serious about surviving the 21st century we will need graduates who are not simply 'globally portable' or even 'globally competent', but also wise global citizens, Globo sapiens. This book contributes to what educators need to know, do and be in order to support transformative learning.
The book is based on work with large, socially and culturally diverse, first-year engineering students at an Australian university of technology. It shows that reflective journals, with appropriate planning and support, can be one pillar of a transformative pedagogy which can encourage significant and even transformative attitude change in relation to gender, culture and the environment. It also offers evidence of improved communication skills and other tangible changes to counter common criticisms that such work is "airy-fairy" and irrelevant.
The author combines communication theory with critical futures thinking to provide layered understandings of how transformative learning affected students’ thinking, learning and behaviour. So the book is both a case-study and a detailed response to the personal and professional challenges that educators all over the world will face as they try to guide students in sustainable directions.