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Writing the Nation

Patrick White and the Indigene

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Cynthia Vanden Driesen

The time for new approaches to White’s work is overdue. Central to the present study are Edward Said’s ideas about the role of the intellectual (and the writer) – of speaking “truth to power,” and also the importance of tracing the “affiliations” of a text and its embeddedness in the world. This approach is not incompatible with Jung’s theory of the ‘great’ artist and his capacity to answer the deep-seated psychic needs of his people. White’s work has contributed in many different ways to the writing of the nation. The spiritual needs of a young nation such as Australia must also comprehend its continual urge towards self-definition. Explored here is one important aspect of that challenge: white Australia’s dealings with the indigenous people of the land, tracing the significance of the Aboriginal presence in three texts selected from the oeuvre of Patrick White: Voss (1957), Riders in the Chariot (1961), and A Fringe of Leaves (1976). Each of these texts interrogates European culture’s denigration of the non-European Other as embedded in the discourse of orientalism. One central merit of White’s commanding perspective is the constant close attention he pays to European hubris and to the paramount autonomy of indigenous culture. There is evidence even of a project which can be articulated as a search for the possibility of white indigeneity, the potential for the white settler’s belonging within the land as does the indigene.

Writing and Seeing

Essays on Word and Image

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Edited by Rui Carvalho Homem and Maria de Fátima Lambert

The essays in this volume are informed by a variety of theoretical assumptions and of critical methodologies, but they all share an interest in the intersections of word and image in a variety of media. This unifying rationale secures the present collection’s central position in the current critical context, defined as it predominantly is by ways of reading that are based on a relational nexus. The intertextual, the intermedial, the intersemiotic are indeed foregrounded and combined in these essays, conceptually as much as in the critical practices favoured by the various contributions.
Studies of literature in its relation to pictorial genres enjoy a relative prominence in the volume – but the range of media and of approaches considered is broad enough to include photography, film, video, television, comic strips, animated film, public art, material culture.
The backgrounds of contributors are likewise diverse – culturally, academically, linguistically.
The volume combines contributions by prominent scholars and critics with essays by younger scholars, from a variety of backgrounds. The resulting plurality of perspective is indeed a source of new insights into the relations between writing and seeing, and it contributes to making this collection an exciting new contribution to word and image studies.

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Edited by Richard Littlejohns and Sara Soncini

Myths of Europe focuses on the identity of Europe, seeking to re-assess its cultural, literary and political traditions in the context of the 21st century. Over 20 authors – historians, political scientists, literary scholars, art and cultural historians – from five countries here enter into a debate. How far are the myths by which Europe has defined itself for centuries relevant to its role in global politics after 9/11? Can ‘Old Europe’ maintain its traditional identity now that the European Union includes countries previously supposed to be on its periphery? How has Europe handled relations with the non-European Other in the past and how is it reacting now to an influx of immigrants and asylum seekers? It becomes clear that founding myths such as Hamlet and St Nicholas have helped construct the European consciousness but also that these and other European myths have disturbing Eurocentric implications. Are these myths still viable today and, if so, to what extent and for what purpose? This volume sits on the interface between culture and politics and is important reading for all those interested in the transmission of myth and in both the past and the future of Europe.

Apollinaire on the Edge

Modern Art, Popular Culture, and the Avant-Garde

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Willard Bohn

The title of the present study refers to the fact that Apollinaire consistently worked at the cutting edge of modern aesthetics. The volume seeks to rehabilitate four experimental genres in particular that have received relatively little attention. The first chapter examines a charming artist’s book entitled The Bestiary, which features illustrations by Raoul Dufy. The second is concerned with a group of poems that celebrate ordinary, everyday life. The next chapter considers Apollinaire’s little-known debt to children’s rhymes. The final chapter discusses an avant-garde drama that was destined to play a key role in the evolution of modern French theater. This book will be of interest to anyone interested in avant-garde aesthetics. It will appeal not only to scholars of twentieth-century poetry but also to devotees of modern art and modern theater.

Images of the North

Histories – Identities – Ideas

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Edited by Sverrir Jakobsson

This interdisciplinary volume seeks to examine and explore the various issues surrounding image construction, identity making and representations of the North, as well as the interconnectedness between those issues. The aim is to elucidate the multiple aspects of the idea of the North, both as a mythological space and a discursive system created and shaped by cultures outside the North as well as from within. The objective of the research project Iceland and Images of the North is to elucidate several aspects of images of the North and to explore their functions in the present, focusing especially on Iceland. What effect have Iceland and its people had on images of the North, and how do those images influence the Icelanders and other nations? The project will be a cooperative, interdisciplinary undertaking by researchers in the humanities and social sciences.

Topodynamics of Arrival

Essays on Self and Pilgrimage

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Edited by Gert Hofmann and Snježana Zorić

Travelling is the art of motion, motion results in moments of human encountering, and such moments manifest themselves in unsettling linguistic repercussions and crises of meaning. Places of arrival also function as inscriptions of such meaningful repercussions, inscriptions of the past crossing the present, of the other crossing the self. The contributions in this book explore places, rituals, texts and scriptures as religious or secular inscriptions – “topographies” – of such “arrivals.”
Each arrival happens, and its very place manifests itself only as a momentous component of the process itself. Arrival is an event of conclusion as well as of urgency for subsequent explorations of new meanings to be read from the topography of the place, mirroring thus a signifying dynamic for the metamorphosis of the traveller’s self: “ topodynamic” of arrival. In this vein this book investigates for the first time the dynamic of cultural formations of space, an aspect of spatiality which since the “spatial turn” in cultural discourse has mostly been neglected.

Revolutions & Watersheds

Transatlantic Dialogues, 1775-1815

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Edited by W.M. Verhoeven and Beth Dolan Kautz

The years between 1775 and 1815 constitute a crucial episode in the evolutionary history of Europe and America. Between the start of the American Revolution, with the first armed clashes between British regulars and American militiamen at Concord and Lexington, and the closing act of the French Revolution, with the eclipse of Napoleon's dreams of pan-European glory on the battlefield of Waterloo, America and Europe witnessed the rise and fall of radicalism, which left virtually no aspect of public and private life untouched. While the American colonies managed to wrench themselves away from their colonial parent, and while France careered down the stormy rapids of its own Revolution, Great Britain went through the turbulent process of redefining itself vis-à-vis both these emerging nations, and the world at large. But the period 1775 to 1815 offers more than the two ideological Revolutions that determined the face of modern America and Europe: feeding into and emanating from these Revolutions there were major watersheds in virtually all areas of cultural, intellectual and political life - varying from the rise of Romanticism to the birth of abolitionism, and from the beginnings of modern feminism to the creation of modern nationhood and its enduring cultural stereotypes.
In this collection of interdisciplinary essays, historians and literary critics from both sides of the Atlantic analyze a broad spectrum of the watersheds and faultlines that arose in this formative era of Euro-American relations. Individually, the essays trace one or more of the transatlantic patterns of intellectual, cultural or scientific cross-pollination between the Old and the New World, between pre- and post-Revolutionary modes and mores. Collectively, the essays argue that the many revolutions that produced the national ideologies, identities and ideas of state of present-day America and Europe did not merely play a role in national debates, but that they very much belonged to an intricate network of transnational and, more particularly, transatlantic dialogues.

Art et littérature

Le voyage entre texte et image

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Edited by Jean-Loup Korzilius

Les voyages relatés dans le présent volume sont en effet fortement associés aux dimensions visuelle et scripturale en ce qu’ils se fondent sur, engendrent ou passent par l’écriture et/ou la figuration, que ce soit simultanément ou consécutivement : le voyage vers des contrées mystérieuses et déroutantes de Marco Polo, dans l’hypermonde, une campagne militaire…, le voyage formateur…, celui entrepris pour raisons pratiques ou intellectuelles…, pour s’adonner à une nostalgie improbable …, au rêve d’ une communauté idéale…, ou pour se confronter à l’étrangeté du lieu visité.
En considérant les échanges variés et serrés entre les deux modes d’expression, le rapport texte/image apparaît dans la perspective du voyage comme la métaphore de l’expérience même du voyage au sens profond du terme.
Cet aspect (trans)formateur du voyage est donc au cœur du présent recueil (…) Comme dans la vie de ces voyageurs, un réseau nouveau, invisible se crée sous l’effet du déplacement entre la lettre et la forme, entre ce qui était au départ inaccessible, ignoré ou impensable et le connu ou convenu…
Il ne reste plus qu’ à souhaiter qu’en voyageant d’un texte à l’autre, d’une illustration à l’autre, d’une ambiance historique et imaginaire à l’autre, le lecteur saisisse, lui aussi, l’occasion de circuler entre les diverses configurations du dialogue visuel/scriptural… (et) entre l’histoire, l’histoire de la littérature, de l’art, la littérature comparée et l’esthétique graphique.

Marius Flothuis

Mozart’s Piano Concertos, especially those composed during the years 1784-’91, are still held in high esteem, two centuries later, by both amateur music-lovers and professional musicians. Strangely enough, only very few comprehensive studies exist on this remarkable section of Mozart’s output.
The present study, first published in German in a slightly abridged form, deals with Mozart’s evolution as a composer of piano concertos; sheds light on the connections between the concertos and other fields of creative activity, as well as on those with other composers of his time. Finally, attention is paid to problems of performance practice.
The author, born in 1914, emeritus professor of Utrecht University and former chairman of the Zentralinstitut für Mozart-Forschung, Salzburg, has been involved with the subject of Mozart’s concertos for about 60 years.

Orientations

Space / Time / Image / Word

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Edited by Claus Clüver, Véronique Plesch and Leo H. Hoek

Based on papers presented at the Fifth Triennial Conference of the International Association of Word and Image Studies (IAWIS/AERTI) held in 2002 in Hamburg, the twenty-two essays in this volume cover a wide array of intermedial relations and a great variety of media, from medieval architecture to interactive digital art. They have been arranged in sections labeled “History and Identity,” “Cultural Memory,” “Texts and Photographs: Cultural Anthropology and Cultural Memory,” “Mixed-Media Texts: Cartography in Contemporary Art and Fiction,” “Mixed-Media Texts: ‘Yellow-Cover Books’, Artists' Books, and Comics,” “Intermedia Texts: Logotypes,” and “Space, Spatialization, Virtual Space.” Displaying a range of methods and interests, these contributions by scholars from Europe, the United States, and South America working in different disciplines confirm the impression voiced by IAWIS president Charlotte Schoell-Glass in her introduction that “the influence of Visual and Cultural Studies has changed the outlook of many who study the interactions of texts and images”.