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Edited by Işil Baş and Donald C. Freeman

Challenging the Boundaries seeks to transcend the limits of literary genres and national cultures, exploring both old and new frontiers in language and literature from an interdisciplinary, multifaceted, and challenging perspective. Selected from the pathbreaking Istanbul conference of the Poetics and Linguistics Association, these papers treat topics ranging from contemporary neurobiology’s insights into the sources of poetic creativity to the cultural theories of Michel Foucault and Hélène Cixous and their literary consequences; from the films of the American director David Lynch to those of the Senegalese artist Djibril Diop Mambéty; from the work of the Turkish novelist Orhan Pamuk to James Joyce’s Ulysses and the stories of Virginia Woolf. This volume will be of particular interest to readers who might wish to become acquainted with the work of able young scholars from an exceptionally wide array of academic cultures and theoretical commitments. The authors whose essays appear in Challenging the Boundaries reflect in their approaches and subjects both the breadth and depth of the international academic community. PALA Papers is a series of volumes comprising essays selected and edited from presentations at the annual conferences of the Poetics and Linguistics Association, an international body of scholars whose work focuses on the interdisciplinary nexus of linguistics, discourse theory, and literary analysis, criticism, and theory. Each volume will present studies that provide models to scholars throughout the world for conducting their own research in this multidisciplinary paradigm on such topics as, among many others, close linguistic analysis of canonical literary works, corpus-based studies of literary narrative, and the linguistic basis of contemporary social and cultural theory.

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Hanadi Loubani and Joseph Rosen

Abstract

Memory’s Exiles

In their dialogue “Memory’s Exiles,” Joseph Rosen and Hanadi Loubani investigate the personal and political stakes of remembering violence and catastrophe in the context of Palestinian and Jewish Diasporas. The point of their dialogue is to contest the “normalizing processes of forgetting,” which they conceive of as a nostalgic memory. In opposition to this culturally and nationalistically narrated nostalgia, they try to present an instance of an enabling “forgetting” as a diasporic mode of memory that opens to the memory of the other’s memory of violence.

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Pascale R. Bos

Abstract

Adopted Memory: The Holocaust, Postmemory, and Jewish Identity in America

The Holocaust is an important motif in the art and literature by American-Jewish authors of Eastern European background who are also descendants of Holocaust survivors. Their imagining of the Holocaust is at times infused with a strong nostalgic “postmemorial” longing. While these works may present this longing in a self-conscious fashion, the ways in which they are received by an American audience without a familial connection to the Holocaust can nevertheless be problematic. For highly assimilated American Jews, these works may not facilitate any kind of a genuine encounter with the horror of the Holocaust, but instead function merely to foster a stronger fascination with the imagined more “authentic” Jewish life of the sthetl. As such, it strengthens Jewish identity on the basis of nostalgia.

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Nina Nørgaard

Through analyses of selected passages from James Joyce’s Ulysses, this article demonstrates how the challenging of the boundaries between linguistics and literary studies can be more than a one-way process aimed at uncovering linguistic patterns of literary texts. The theoretical basis of the article is Halliday & Hasan’s concept of cohesion as presented in Cohesion in English (1976). While demonstrating the usefulness of Halliday & Hasan’s approach in literary analysis by uncovering aspects of Joyce’s extensive use of cohesion as a meaning-making resource, the application of their approach to Joyce’s novel at the same time points to useful adjustments of the concept. It is thus argued that just like more regular examples of synonymy proper, metaphorical relations between lexical items that are usually semantically far apart are cohesive, too, as are ties that stretch over considerably longer passages than those typically considered in analyses of cohesion. While arguing for certain extensions of Halliday & Hasan’s cohesive categories, the article simultaneously acknowledges and discusses methodological problems involved in such extensions and furthermore considers the upper and lower limits of cohesion.

Constellations of the Transnational

Modernity, Culture, Critique

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Edited by Sudeep Dasgupta and Esther Peeren

In the wake of proliferating discourses around globalisation and culture, some central questions around cultural politics have acquired a commonsensical and hegemonic character in contemporary intellectual discourse. The politics of difference, the possibilities of hybridity and the potential of multiple liminalities frame much discussion around the transnational dimensions of culture and post-identity politics. In this volume, the economic, political and social consequences of the focus on ‘culture’ in contemporary theories of globalization are analysed around the disparate fields of architecture, museum discourse, satellite television, dub poetry, carnival and sub-national theatre. The discourses of hybridity, diaspora, cultural difference minoritization are critically interrogated and engaged with through close analysis of cultural objects and practices. The essays thus intervene in the debate around modernity, globalization and cultural politics, and the volume as a whole provides a critical constellation through which the complexity of transnational culture can be framed. Thinking through the particular, the essays limn the absent universality of forms of capitalist globalization and the volume as a whole provides multiple perspectives from which to enter the singular modernity of our times in all its complexity.

Diaspora and Memory

Figures of Displacement in Contemporary Literature, Arts and Politics

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Edited by Marie-Aude Baronian, Stephan Besser and Yolande Jansen

Experiences of migration and dwelling-in-displacement impinge upon the lives of an ever increasing number of people worldwide, with business class comfort but more often with unrelenting violence. Since the early 1990s, the political and cultural realities of global migration have led to a growing interest in the different forms of “diasporic” existence and identities. The articles in this book do not focus on the external boundaries of diaspora – what is diasporic and what is not? – but on one of its most important internal boundaries, which is indicated by the second term in the title of this book: memory. It is not by chance that the right to remember, the responsibility to recall, are central issues of the debates in diasporic communities and their relation to their cultural and political surroundings. The relation of diaspora and memory contains important critical and maybe even subversive potentials. Memory can transcend the territorial logic of dispersal and return, and emerge as a competing source of diasporic identity. The articles in this volume explore how, shaped by the responsibilities of testimony as well as by the normalizing forces of amnesia and forgetting and political interests, memory is a performative, figurative process rather than a secure space of identity.

Art et littérature

Le voyage entre texte et image

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Edited by Jean-Loup Korzilius

Les voyages relatés dans le présent volume sont en effet fortement associés aux dimensions visuelle et scripturale en ce qu’ils se fondent sur, engendrent ou passent par l’écriture et/ou la figuration, que ce soit simultanément ou consécutivement : le voyage vers des contrées mystérieuses et déroutantes de Marco Polo, dans l’hypermonde, une campagne militaire…, le voyage formateur…, celui entrepris pour raisons pratiques ou intellectuelles…, pour s’adonner à une nostalgie improbable …, au rêve d’ une communauté idéale…, ou pour se confronter à l’étrangeté du lieu visité.
En considérant les échanges variés et serrés entre les deux modes d’expression, le rapport texte/image apparaît dans la perspective du voyage comme la métaphore de l’expérience même du voyage au sens profond du terme.
Cet aspect (trans)formateur du voyage est donc au cœur du présent recueil (…) Comme dans la vie de ces voyageurs, un réseau nouveau, invisible se crée sous l’effet du déplacement entre la lettre et la forme, entre ce qui était au départ inaccessible, ignoré ou impensable et le connu ou convenu…
Il ne reste plus qu’ à souhaiter qu’en voyageant d’un texte à l’autre, d’une illustration à l’autre, d’une ambiance historique et imaginaire à l’autre, le lecteur saisisse, lui aussi, l’occasion de circuler entre les diverses configurations du dialogue visuel/scriptural… (et) entre l’histoire, l’histoire de la littérature, de l’art, la littérature comparée et l’esthétique graphique.

Marius Flothuis

Mozart’s Piano Concertos, especially those composed during the years 1784-’91, are still held in high esteem, two centuries later, by both amateur music-lovers and professional musicians. Strangely enough, only very few comprehensive studies exist on this remarkable section of Mozart’s output.
The present study, first published in German in a slightly abridged form, deals with Mozart’s evolution as a composer of piano concertos; sheds light on the connections between the concertos and other fields of creative activity, as well as on those with other composers of his time. Finally, attention is paid to problems of performance practice.
The author, born in 1914, emeritus professor of Utrecht University and former chairman of the Zentralinstitut für Mozart-Forschung, Salzburg, has been involved with the subject of Mozart’s concertos for about 60 years.