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This book contains a selection of papers presented at the Red Sea VII conference titled “The Red Sea and the Gulf: Two Maritime Alternative Routes in the Development of Global Economy, from Late Prehistory to Modern Times”. The Red Sea and the Gulf are similar geographically and environmentally, and complementary to each other, as well as being competitors in their economic and cultural interactions with the Mediterranean and the Indian Ocean. The chapters of the volume are grouped in three sections, corresponding to the various historical periods. Each chapter of the book offers the reader the opportunity to travel across the regions of the Red Sea and the Gulf, and from the Mediterranean to the Indian Ocean from prehistory to the contemporary era.

With contributions by Ahmed Hussein Abdelrahman, Serena Autiero, Mahmoud S. Bashir, Kathryn A. Bard, Alemsege, Beldados, Ioana A. Dumitru, Serena Esposito, Rodolfo Fattovich, Luigi Gallo, Michal Gawlikowski, Caterina Giostra, Sunil Gupta, Michael Harrower, Martin Hense, Linda Huli, Sarah Japp, Serena Massa, Ralph K. Pedersen, Jacke S. Phillips, Patrice Pomey, Joanna K. Rądkowska, Mike Schnelle, Lucy Semaan, Steven E. Sidebotham, Shadia Taha, Husna Taha Elatta, Joanna Then-Obłuska and Iwona Zych
Author: Sadi Maréchal

The late antique papyri concerning baths and bathing habits are arranged chronologically, each papyrus having a code starting with P. The ostraca are grouped separately, each entry starting with an O-code. For each papyrus, the following information is presented: Ref. Reference to the

In: Public Baths and Bathing Habits in Late Antiquity
Author: Sadi Maréchal

little changed in Late Antiquity. If one considers the collective immersion pools as the most characteristic element, especially in comparison to the Greek-style baths (however, see the remarks by Monica Trümper presented in chapter 1), one will conclude that late antique baths had turned towards a more

In: Public Baths and Bathing Habits in Late Antiquity
Author: Sadi Maréchal

chapter commenced. By including the second half of the 7th c., we could (theoretically) observe how the Roman-style baths in North Africa and the Middle East ‘survived’ the first decades of Muslim rule. The further development of bathing habits under Early Islam will only be presented as an ‘epilogue’, as

In: Public Baths and Bathing Habits in Late Antiquity
Author: Sadi Maréchal

. In the following chapter, an attempt is made to present informative references from the most authoritative writers of the period between AD 300 and AD 700 in the whole of the Mediterranean world. 1 Contrary to the historical and archaeological evidence, there will be no limitation to a

In: Public Baths and Bathing Habits in Late Antiquity
Author: Sadi Maréchal

Small Baths of the Villa Hadriana (fig. 6). The basic components, i.e. the succession of palaestra—frigidarium—tepidarium—caldarium are presented in dynamic spatial units, with several additional rooms, including two heated rooms with pools, a calida piscina , and a round solarium , all facing south

In: Public Baths and Bathing Habits in Late Antiquity
Author: Sadi Maréchal

in Yvon Thébert’s catalogue, 1 each newly built bath is briefly presented, giving the following information: excavation history of the bathhouse relevant bibliography construction date continued use of the bathhouse, date of abandonment and possible reuse of the building a description of the

In: Public Baths and Bathing Habits in Late Antiquity
Author: Sadi Maréchal

favour of private baths (see above chapter 1, p. 33). The archaeological evidence that has come forward in the present research shows a more nuanced picture. We should also keep in mind that the small size of a bathhouse does not necessarily imply that it was just a basic facility without any luxury. The

In: Public Baths and Bathing Habits in Late Antiquity
Author: Sadi Maréchal

within a complex fabric of streets, public and private space, water supply and disposal, etc. In the following chapter, the baths in Rome, Ostia, Cuicul, Thamugadi, Carthage, Sufetula, Ptolemais and Scythopolis will be presented. At the end of this chapter, there is an overview of the archaeological

In: Public Baths and Bathing Habits in Late Antiquity