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Hannah Marcuson and Theo van den Hout

out, be found in Hittite ritual manuscripts. 7 Hittite ritual texts are attested on cuneiform tablets mainly from the capital city Hattuša. These texts are from a single archive controlled by the Hittite state, comprising several buildings, which enjoyed a lifespan of several hundred years and were

Jared L. Miller

© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2010 JANER 10.1 Also available online – brill.nl/jane DOI: 10.1163/156921210X500521 PASKUWATTI’S RITUAL: REMEDY FOR IMPOTENCE OR ANTIDOTE TO HOMOSEXUALITY? JARED L. MILLER Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Geschwister-Scholl-Platz 1, D-80539, München

Joseph Lam

with ḫaž- “to hear”). 17 In particular, he noted numerous examples from the Hurrian portions of the itkalzi -rituals from Boğazköy that must refer to parts of the body being anointed with oil, phrases which von Brandenstein and others noted as parallels to RS 1.004 but which were not fully

Series:

Tzvi Abusch and Daniel Schwemer

Among the most important sources for understanding the cultures and systems of thought of ancient Mesopotamia is a large body of magical and medical texts written in the Sumerian and Akkadian languages. An especially significant branch of this literature centres upon witchcraft. Mesopotamian anti-witchcraft rituals and incantations attribute ill-health and misfortune to the magic machinations of witches and prescribe ceremonies, devices, and treatments for dispelling witchcraft, destroying the witch, and protecting and curing the patient. The Corpus of Mesopotamian Anti-Witchcraft Rituals aims to present a reconstruction of this body of texts; it provides critical editions of the relevant rituals and prescriptions based on the study of the cuneiform tablets and fragments recovered from the libraries of ancient Mesopotamia.


"Now that we have the second volume, we the more admire the thoughtful organisation of the entire project, the strict methods followed, and the insightful observations and decisions made." Martin Stol, Bibliotheca Orientalis lxxIV n° 3-4, mei-augustus 2017

S.J. Christopher Frechette

The Mesopotamian ritual-prayer Nisaba 1, a monolingual text in Akkadian addressed to the goddess of grain, blends the functionality of two genres: Akkadian Šuillas and Kultmittelbeschwörungen. Like Kultmittelbeschwörungen, it is addressed to a material (here, the flour identified with Nisaba) in order to activate it for ritual use. As do other Akkadian Šuilla-prayers, it serves to gain a favorable reception from an influential deity whose powerful intercession it requests for reconciling the speaker with his or her personal god and goddess. The royal ritual bīt salā’ mê provides important context for establishing functionality. An edition of the prayer is appended to the article.

Alfonso Archi

precisely for this purpose. KTU 1.161 is the funerary ritual probably for Niqmaddu III, the second-to-last king: You have been called, O Rapa’ūma of the Earth, You have been summoned, O Assembly of Didānu; King ‘Ammit̠tamru has been called, King Niqmaddu has been called as well. O Throne of

Dennis Pardee

The Ugaritic ritual texts provide the only extensive documentary data for Late Bronze cultic practice in the greater Syro-Palestinian region. These texts, in a West-Semitic language that belongs to the same family as Hebrew and Aramaic, reflect the actual practice of a sacrificial cult in the city of Ugarit in the late twelfth–early eleventh centuries B.C.E. Based on new collations of the tablets, these texts and translations provide ready access to this direct witness to the form taken by one of the predecessors of the biblical sacrificial cult. In addition to the narrowly ritual texts, which were composed in prose and in a very laconic form of expression, a number of poetic texts are presented that reveal the ideological link that existed between cultic practice and the concept of royalty. While the prose ritual texts document a regular system of offerings to the great deities of the pantheon, related directly to the lunar cycle and less directly to the solar year, some of the poetic texts reveal the desire on the part of the kings of Ugarit to maintain ties with their departed ancestors. The kings saw their effective power as consisting of a continuum from the royal ancestors through to the reigning king and the passage of this power as being effected by ritual practice. More mundane concerns were also addressed ritually, such as protecting horses or other equids from snakebite, finding a cure for a sick child, or defending people from attack by sorcerers. The practice of divination at Ugarit is documented by other texts, both in the form of “manuals,” collections of omens from past practice, and in the form of accounts of real-world consultations of a divinatory priest by someone seeking guidance.

Paperback edition is available from the Society of Biblical Literature (www.sbl-site.org)

Series:

Tzvi Abusch and Daniel Schwemer

Among the most important sources for understanding the cultures and systems of thought of ancient Mesopotamia is a large body of magical and medical texts written in the Sumerian and Akkadian languages. An especially significant branch of this literature centres upon witchcraft. Mesopotamian anti-witchcraft rituals and incantations attribute ill-health and misfortune to the magic machinations of witches and prescribe ceremonies, devices, and treatments for dispelling witchcraft, destroying the witch, and protecting and curing the patient. The Corpus of Mesopotamian Anti-witchcraft Rituals aims to present a reconstruction of this body of texts; it provides critical editions of the relevant rituals and prescriptions based on the study of the cuneiform tablets and fragments recovered from the libraries of ancient Mesopotamia.

This is the first volume in the three-part Corpus of Mesopotamian Anti-witchcraft Rituals series. Volumes two and three are expected in 2015 and 2018 respectively.

"Even in its incomplete form, Mesopotamian Anti-Witchcraft Rituals is a major contribution to the study of witchcraft, supernatural belief, folk medicine (both supernatural and non-supernatural), theories of magic, incantations, and ritual. This edition is required reading for any scholar with an interest in these topics."
David Elton Gay, Indiana University

Noel K. Weeks

The study of the connection of myth and ritual in the ane has been dominated by two approaches, both of which see a clear logical connection between the two: the Myth and Ritual theory of Samuel Hooke and others, 1 which interprets the connection in terms of the securing of fertility through

Giulia Torri

a hittite magical ritual to be performed 129 © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2004 JANER 4 Also available online – www.brill.nl A HITTITE MAGICAL RITUAL TO BE PERFORMED IN AN EMERGENCY* GIULIA TORRI Abstract The Hittite magical ritual KUB 17.28 ii 33-61 iii 1-17 is part of a Sammeltafel in which