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Batsheva Goldman-Ida

Hasidic Art and the Kabbalah presents eight case studies of manuscripts, ritual objects, and folk art developed by Hasidic masters in the mid-eighteenth to late nineteenth centuries, whose form and decoration relate to sources in the Zohar, German Pietism, and Safed Kabbalah. Examined at the delicate and difficult to define interface between seemingly simple, folk art and complex ideological and conceptual outlooks which contain deep, abstract symbols, the study touches on aspects of object history, intellectual history, the decorative arts, and the history of religion. Based on original texts, the focus of this volume is on the subjective experience of the user at the moment of ritual, applying tenets of process philosophy and literary theory – Wolfgang Iser, Gaston Bachelard, and Walter Benjamin – to the analysis of objects.

Rachel Hachlili

The Menorah, the ancient seven-armed candelabrum, was the most important Jewish symbol both in the Land of Israel and the Diaspora. The menorah was the most important of the Temple vessels and it also came to symbolize Judaism, when it was necessary to distinguish synagogues and Jewish tombs from Christian or pagan structures. This book is a continuation of Hachlili's earlier comprehensive study, The Menorah, the Ancient Seven-armed Candelabrum: Origin, Form and Significance. Brill, 2001. It entails the compilation and study of the material of the past two decades, presenting the theme of the menorah, focusing on its development, form, meaning, significance, and symbolism in antiquity.

Series:

Yvonne Kozlovsky Golan

. It is a multilayered film depicting the Jewish community in wartime Tunisia, and tells the story of Myriam’s marriage on the eve of the Nazi invasion. More than just a drama of war and rescue, the film reveals the lifestyle of Maghreb Jews, and more specifically, their wedding rituals. These multiple

Series:

Yvonne Kozlovsky Golan

able to smuggle in dried fruit and recite the blessing over the Sabbath wine, although it was recited symbolically in a group – without wine. Other religious precepts were also observed, such as men’s prayers, and arrangements for weddings and the ritual baths were altered to fit camp conditions