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Series:

David Frankfurter

or to focus on discourses of ambiguous/illegitimate ritual (without use of magic as a translation) as described in Part 2, or conversely to examine texts and artifacts with ritual or apotropaic implications as described in Part 3—again, independently of a category magic. Thus this Guide does not

Series:

Andrew T. Wilburn

interest and debate has raged over the object because of its similarity to a set of spell instructions preserved in the Great Magical Papyrus of Paris, ( P. Bib. Nat. Supp . gr. no. 574 = PGM IV 296–466), a text dated to the fourth or fifth century CE . 3 Ancient ritual texts often functioned like

Explaining Christian Origins and Early Judaism

Contributions from Cognitive and Social Science

Series:

Edited by Petri Luomanen, Ilkka Pyysiäinen and Risto Uro

Cognitive science of religion is a radically new paradigm in the study of religion. Apart from psychology and anthropology of religion, also historians of religion have shown increasing interest in this approach. This volume is groundbreaking in combining cognitive analysis with historical and social-scientific approaches to biblical materials, Christian origins, and early Judaism. The book is in four parts: an introduction to cognitive and social-scientific approaches, applications of cognitive science, applications of conceptual blending theory, and applications of socio-cognitive analyses. The book will be of interest for historians of religion, biblical scholars, and those working in the cognitive science of religion.

Series:

Andrew T. Wilburn

, shorthand in Rome for illicit ritual activity. 3 The mechanics of directing hostile forces against Germanicus were twofold: (1) tablets were inscribed with the victim’s name and (2) these objects were placed in a space that he inhabited. The inclusion of Germanicus’ name ensured that the ritual effect of

Series:

Naomi Janowitz

(dependence on context and creation of context) of words and other signs offers new ways of conceptualizing and classifying rituals in general. 9 As with magic, in the case of mysticism it is hard to escape a certain circularity. 10 Jewish mystical rites, for example, such as those in the Hekhalot texts, are

The Covenant in Judaism and Paul

A Study of Ritual Boundaries as Identity Markers

Series:

Christiansen

The Covenant in Judaism and Paul deals with biblical and intertestamental uses of covenant and related rituals, challenging the view that baptism replaces circumcision, since baptism is entry into the new covenant, and showing that ritual boundaries are replaced or redefined since identity has changed.
The investigation uses social categories, “identity” as a term that offers an explanation for a group's selfunderstanding and “boundary” as a term for entry rite of affirmation marker.
Part A looks at the Old Testament background to aspects of the covenant. Part B examines covenant identity and rituals in Palestinian Judaism as featured in Jubilees, the Temple Scroll, the Damascus Document, and the Community Rule. It includes a brief analysis of the baptism administered by John the Baptist. Part C analyses Paul's views on covenant, circumcision, and baptism against this background.

Karl Heinrich Rengstorf

OLD AND NEW TESTAMENT TRACES OF A FORMULA OF THE JUDAEAN ROYAL RITUAL1) BY KARL HEINRICH RENGSTORF Various elements of the ancient oriental Royal Ritual 2) have remained alive over a long period of time. Some of them have exercised a varied and highly important influence in the course of the

Karl Heinrich Rengstorf

OLD AND NEW TESTAMENT TRACES OF A FORMULA OF THE JUDAEAN ROYAL RITUAL1) BY KARL HEINRICH RENGSTORF Various elements of the ancient oriental Royal Ritual 2) have remained alive over a long period of time. Some of them have exercised a varied and highly important influence in the course of the

Stephen Finlan

This examination of Gentile and Jewish religious and literary descriptions of sacrificial and expulsion rituals provides a useful background to the study of Paul’s metaphorical use of sacrifice and scapegoat to characterize the significance of the death of Jesus. In addition to offering an overview of Paul’s use of cultic metaphors and an assessment of Paul’s synthesis of martyrology and cultic metaphor, this work shows how Paul uses still other metaphors (acquittal, reconciliation, adoption) to picture the beneficial after-effects of that death.

Paperback edition is available from the Society of Biblical Literature (www.sbl-site.org)

Jesus, Paul, and Early Christianity

Studies in Honour of Henk Jan de Jonge

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Edited by Rieuwerd Buitenwerf, Harm Hollander and Johannes Tromp

This collection of essays by leading experts in New Testament scholarship addresses core themes in the study of early Christianity. The topics addressed include text-critical issues relating to the New Testament, the historical situation in which the earliest Christian documents were composed, early Christian rituals, historical questions concerning Jesus and Paul, and the origin and development of important theological ideas in the early Church.

This volume is dedicated to Henk Jan de Jonge (Emeritus Professor in the New Testament, Leiden University) in honour of his important contributions to the field of New Testament Studies.