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Olívia Maria Gomes da Cunha

’s comments do not contradict the fact that funerary ceremonies like puu baaka shown in the video combine sombre family obligations and the more festive enjoyment of Maroon and non-Maroon guests. The transformations in funerary rituals among Maroon peoples, whether held in the villages or in urban

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Rogério Brittes W. Pires

As a neophyte ethnographer in Botopasi – an Upper Suriname village associated with the Moravian church – the aspect that most bewildered me about Christian Saamaka mortuary rituals wasn’t how strange the actual rites were, even though they were completely different from anything I had ever

Series:

Laura Caso Barrera

(Barrera Vásquez 1981, Vol.  II : 156). Some of the historical, calendrical and ritual texts appearing in these manuscripts were possibly taken from texts in Maya glyphs that were copied down using the Roman alphabet. The name “Chilam Balam” refers to one of the most famous Maya “prophets” or chilamob

Series:

Stuart Strange

voice speaking through a human host. As Martin Holbraad ( 2013 ) has observed for Cuban Ifa divination, Afro-Atlantic ritual systems pose a problem for how Anthropologists think about the philosophical and theological mainstays of transcendence and immanence. For my Ndyuka informants, this is not a

Series:

H.U.E. Thoden van Velzen

-and-burn agriculture meant that vast areas needed to be at the disposal of the Maroons. Space to build houses was in short supply 21 When felling trees to make room for the growing population of the Mama Ndyuka region, some Maroons acted without distinguishing between types of trees and without the necessary ritual

Series:

Olívia Maria Gomes da Cunha

different Maroon matriclans. Anteceding the appearance of the nation state and its postcolonial legal systems, Maroon socialities still reaffirm a set of rules that define the exercise of power and ‘living well’ (Price 1975 :32) within the ambit of the village , along with rituals and rights of

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Alice Gaby and John Bradley

Yanyuwa spans multiple language varieties defined by contexts of use. These include a variety used in ceremonies and ritual contexts, a ‘respectable’ variety which must be used in communication between various types of relative (e.g. a man and his brother-in-law), a ‘Saltwater Language’ used when on the

Series:

Corinna Campbell

bandámmba (hereafter spelled banamba) 2 would be flourishing as one of the most popular Maroon dances in Suriname, French Guyana, and their diasporic communities abroad. Today, in addition to the ritual and celebratory contexts with which it was initially associated, banamba is abundantly referenced in

Series:

Richard Price

the time when its inhabitants lived relatively stable lives, running their own political and judicial affairs, engaging in complex and frequent communal rituals, and enjoying economic self -sufficiency through their hunting, fishing, and gardening, supplemented by the men ’s trips to the coast to

Series:

Jean Moomou

/manenge wooko ), 4 in terms of social and ritual obligations, there existed a complementarity. In the past, this division did not give any power of superiority to one sex over the other. Put otherwise, the social distinction between men and women was not a synonym of inequality in the treatment of one sex to