Search Results

Series:

Sarah Albrecht

control of the people, in the levy of land tax, tribute, tolls and customs, in the punishment of thieves and robbers, in the settlement of disputes, in the punishment of offences, the kāfirs act according to their discretion. There are, indeed, certain Islamic rituals, e.g. Friday and ʿId prayers

Series:

Sarah Albrecht

territory of freedom ( dār al-ḥurriyya ), where humans, whether Muslims or non-Muslims, enjoy the basic freedoms which include the freedom of belief and its safe practice. Wherever you are able to enjoy your rights as an honorable human being, including your right to publicly practice your religious rituals

Series:

Sarah Albrecht

the “territory of Islam,” that is Muslim sovereignty ( sulṭa ), irrespective of whether Muslims were in the majority or minority, the at least partial application of Islamic legal rules ( aḥkām al-islām ), and the practice of Islamic rituals, and lastly, the provision of safety ( amn ) for Muslims. 73

Series:

Sarah Albrecht

bearing testimony to one’s faith. He argues that the ability to practice one’s religion is ultimately not contingent upon the degree to which the public or private domain is marked by Islamic institutions or ritual life, but on the believers’ spiritual state of mind and the ways they find to bear

Series:

Sarah Albrecht

Ḥanafīs, most Shāfiʿī jurists held that political sovereignty was not a precondition for a territory to be considered dār al-islām and emphasized, instead, the provision of safety and the freedom to practice Islamic rituals. 24 Unlike the Ḥanafīs, however, they did not consider the application of

Series:

Sarah Albrecht

meanings in legal discourse, e.g., in the context of Islamic perspectives on boundaries, in Sufi writings, and ritual practice. 24 Since the 1990s, territorial concepts have also become an object of research in historical scholarship on Muslims living under non-Muslim rule. 25 Aside from these historical

Series:

Sarah Albrecht

terminological nature ( ikhtilāfāt fī al-ṣiyāgha al-lafẓiyya ). These definitions all revolved around one meaning on which they all agreed, namely that Muslims are in control ( siyāda ) of that territory, so that all of them are able to implement Islamic rules and rituals ( aḥkām al-islām wa-shaʿāʾiruhu ). It is

Series:

Sarah Albrecht

A fatwa issued by the ecfr on the matter reads that “migrating [to a non-Muslim country] is indeed legitimate ( mashrūʿa ṣaḥīḥa ) if directed towards an environment that allows [the Muslim] to practice most of the religious rituals . Such an emigration may even be a desirable aim ( maṭlūba

Series:

Sarah Albrecht

rituals,” 30 although it does permit Christian proselytization – a threat which has, in his view, been overwhelmingly ignored by minority fiqh advocates. 31 Other authors, such as al-Būṭī, Ibn Bāz, and al-ʿUthaymīn, also consider secular societies to be hostile toward religion, 32 contending, like al

Zayde Antrim

. Generally these collections also included a discussion of the etymology of toponyms, an excursus into the ancient history of the site, an account of its conquest or foundation after the coming of Islam, and attention to its ritual topography, particularly to the locations of its mosques, shrines, and tombs