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Francisco, 1987; orig. 1979) p. 176). In correspondence with Schmitt, Benjamin acknowledged the jurist's influence on him. See now the literature discussed in Lutz P. Koepnick, "The Spectacle, the Trauerspiel, and the Politics of Resolution: Benjamin Reading the Baroque Reading Weimar", Critical1nquiry 22

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

hatred grasped only how to nourish itself on this spectacle. The religious man thinks only of himself.—What Luther saw was the corruption of the Papacy, while precisely the opposite was palpably obvious: the old corruption, the peccatum originale , Christianity, no longer sat on the Papal throne

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

Rahel was caught up in the salon theater-game more than anyone else. She was an actress for each of her guests; she "would have liked to show herself like a 'spectacle,.,,22 Like von Humboldt, she needed to be in a play in order to feel alive and confirm her existence. The only difference was that for

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

., p. 261. the no man’s land between being and not-yet-being,” the “way that does not even signal itself as a signi fi cation, that in no way shines forth,” 61 the surplus of the given that does not present itself as a vis- ible spectacle and hence cannot be an object of predication or denial. We may

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

moment or of an isolated, ostensibly random event, a historical episode is created—a kind of spotlight that disperses the darkness of the chaos. This vision or even spectacle is essential for creating historical continuity, and for creating meaning, which is also the creation of myth. For both Kagan

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

thousands; every role synchronized by divine speech alone to produce a splendidly orchestrated twilight spectacle. 34 The pur- pose of presenting such an orderly change of stage and scenery is to bestir in the worshiper the desire to have the great Designer extend His reign of the natural world over the

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy