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Anti-Judaism and Antisemitism in Medieval and Early Modern Visual Culture
In thirteen essays by leading art historians, and a critical introduction by the editor, Beyond the Yellow Badge seeks to reframe the relationship between European visual culture and the changing aspect of the Christian majority’s negative conceptions of Jews and Judaism during the Middle Ages and early modern periods. By situating their subjects within a broad continuum of historical and critical issues, the authors inquire into such questions as the shifting politics of toleration and intoleration; the role played by anti-Judaic legends in the formation of Christian cults; the role of positive evaluations of Hebrew, Jewish learning and Christian hopes for Jewish conversion; and the transformation of religious anti-Judaism into its modern racial and nationalistic counterparts. The book will be of special interest to art historians, cultural historians, students of Christian theology and Jewish history, and to educated general readers.

This book is also available in paperback.

is probably the essence of the human soul, which constitutes free choice. In certain autos sacramentales it is called “ albedrío .” 59 On the figure of the devil in Spanish Golden Age drama, see Luis González Fernández, The Physical and Rhetorical Spectacle of the Devil in the Spanish Golden

In: European Journal of Jewish Studies

Keith Gandal, in The Virtues of the Vicious: Jacob Riis, Stephen Crane, and the Spectacle of the Slum, treats Riis even more generously. Although Gandal promises a close reading of the texts and photographs of Riis, he declines to comment on Riis's unambiguous racist sentiments. Gandal correctly

In: Zutot

spectacle. Moreover, the act of revival was connected to its broader liturgical context. The tzaddik did not only revive the prayer; he also introduced a performance that was relevant to the timing of Rosh Hashanah. The tzaddik performed the role of God at the approximate time (according to the Midrash

In: Zutot

at all, and vanished amongst the crowd. ‘A greenhorn,’ Harry thought, watching as he went away. 18 Here, the Jews are present at the spectacle of the burning. The older generation Jew retains his uniqueness from the totalizing unity of the violent mob through his identity as a Jew. As a result of

In: Zutot

Jew dance around in bears clothes in order to entertain their guests. Or worse, as also happened, that they turned a hunt into an extremely funny spectacle: Jewish women were commanded to climb in trees. They had to imitate the call of the cuckoo. The hunters then pointed their rifles filled with

In: Zutot

voted upon, as was usually the case with a statement of a new government policy. This was because Labour knew that there was no chance of the new policy being approved as it stood. The Commons was treated to the unedifying spectacle of a schism between the Prime Minister and Lord Passfield, his Colonial

In: European Journal of Jewish Studies

moment, when the tourist turns a postcard over, a public spectacle is replaced by empty space, and the act of looking ends, itself replaced by the act of writing. This symbolic eye shutting, occurring when a person concentrates on a small white square, marks the turning inward into private space. Unlike

In: European Journal of Jewish Studies

Polish Literature , 30, note 21, mentions the Hebrew translation of a Polish play by Stanisław Gabriel Kozłowski (“ ‘Maśʾa Ester’: ḥizayon be-šeš maʿarkhot yesodoto be-divrei ha-yamim me-et ha-sofer ha-polani Kozlovski u-meturgam ʿivrit me-ʾet Yisraʾel Frenkel [‘Esther’s burden’: A spectacle in six acts

In: European Journal of Jewish Studies