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The International Criminal Court

The Making of the Rome Statute: Issues, Negotiations and Results

Edited by Thomas H.C. Lee

Francis Kofi Abiew

The topic of humanitarian intervention has become increasingly significant since the end of the Cold War. Despite a substantial body of literature on the subject in the past, recent developments justify a contemporary study of the subject.
This book is not only timely, given the crises which have occasioned United Nations interventions over the past several years, but enduring, as international political structures undergo stress and reform, and as international law and international relations theorists grapple with the sovereignty/intervention problem. It defends the emergence of a right of humanitarian intervention and argues that state sovereignty is not incompatible with humanitarian intervention. After a thorough review of historical precedents, the book concludes by assessing contemporary developments in terms of sources of support for intervention on humanitarian grounds.

Stuart Maslen

Anti-Personnel Mines under Humanitarian Law: A View From the Vanishing Point considers in depth the various customary and conventional legal regimes applicable to the use of anti-personnel mines. All involved with the global effort to control and eliminate anti-personnel mines as well as the policy-makers who are concerned about the devastation resulting from the widespread deployment of these arbitrary weapons need to familiarize themselves with the information presented in this timely volume.



Published under the Transnational Publishers imprint.

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M.C. Zwanenburg

Quis custodiet ipsos custodies? In other words, who guards the guardians? At a time when the mandate of many peace support operations includes halting violations of international humanitarian law by third parties, there is still a lack of clarity concerning accountability of peace support operations themselves. This book addresses that accountability, focusing on peace support operations under the command and control of the United Nations and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. It is concerned with the accountability of international organizations as well as troops contributing and member states, but not of individuals.
Drawing on existing and emerging doctrines of international law, including the law of state responsibility, the law of responsibility of international organizations, international institutional law and international humanitarian law, and on the basis of state practice, this book makes a strong plea for improving mechanisms to implement the accountability of peace support operations under international humanitarian law.
The Paul Reuter Prize 2006 was awarded to Marten Zwanenburg for this book.

Series:

Edited by Daniel Bardonnet

After twenty years of negotiation within the framework of the Disarmament Conference, the Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production, Stockpiling and Use of Chemical Weapons and on Their Destruction was signed in Paris between 13 and 15 January 1993. At the same time, the signatory States adopted a resolution instituting a Preparatory Commission, established in The Hague, with the aim of `the prompt and effective establishment of the future Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons'.
A variety of converging considerations led the Curatorium of the Academy of International Law to organize a workshop on this subject: first the very interesting nature of the highly sensitive problems raised by the destruction of chemical weapons, both on the strategic and political planes, as well as on technical, financial and ecological grounds; but also the originality and difficulty, from the legal standpoint, of the numerous questions which will inevitably arise in connection with the application of the Paris Convention.
Finally, the Paris Convention, which is innovative in many respects, particularly in that it institutes international control over the whole of an industrial activity, may be used as a model in other areas of disarmament, in particular the area of nuclear weapons.