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Edited by Anne Moffatt and Maxeme Tall

This is the first modern language translation of the entire text of the tenth-century Greek Book of Ceremonies (De ceremoniis), a work compiled and edited by the Byzantine emperor Constantine VII (905-959). It preserves material from the fifth century through to the 960s. Chapters deal with diverse subjects of concern to the emperor including the role of the court, secular and ecclesiastical ceremonies, processions within the Palace and through Constantinople to its churches, the imperial tombs, embassies, banquets and dress, the role of the demes, hippodrome festivals with chariot races, imperial appointments, the hierarchy of the Byzantine administration, the equipping of expeditions, including to recover Crete from the Arabs, and the lists of ecclesiastical provinces and bishoprics.

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Ryan W. Strickler

are often employed without precision. In recent decades, apocalypticism has been the subject of significant scholarly output, particularly from the fields of biblical and early Christian studies. There have been several important studies on Byzantine apocalypticism. 7 However, there has yet to appear

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Inbar Graiver

significant shift in the understanding of the human person and permitted, in the words of Guy Stroumsa, “the emergence of a newly reflexive self, that is, a subject turned back upon itself in ways unknown before”. 4 It has been suggested that this new interest in the inner life of the individual is related

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Cynthia J. Stallman-Pacitti

Edited by John B. Burke

cross and icons and darkness falls on the enemy so that they kill each other. 312: A group of four thousand begs for mercy and they are baptized. Some are ordained to serve in Calabria, which is subject to St Pankratios until the Apostle Peter, passing through Ravenna, ordains Stephen as bishop of

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Cynthia J. Stallman-Pacitti

Edited by John B. Burke

Avaro-Slavic incursions into Greece and the Balkans must have been the subject of some concern in Sicily. The Chronicle of Monemvasia 42–43 states that refugees from Lakonia made their way to Sicily, to Demenna, probably Val Demone in North-east Sicily, not far from Taormina, where they were called