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Laura A. Janda

following dynamic link: https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.5759442 . Today I’m going to talk about Cognitive Linguistics and Cultural Linguistics, and the subject of this talk is how language and culture as systems co-evolve. One could ask the question: which comes first, culture or language? And I will

Series:

George Lakoff

negative meaning and a positive grammar and a negative grammar with a positive meaning. It is special constructions in English. For example, if I say to you “why paint your house purple?” There is no subject, there is no auxiliary, and what I’m saying is “I’m suggesting that perhaps you should not paint

Series:

George Lakoff

, not “was,” but “lived.” “Once upon a time, there was living on the top of the mountain an old woman.” You get “was living” and a locational and then the subject at the end. So when you are beginning a discourse, you can get that variation on there constructions, on the existential there . It’s the

Series:

George Lakoff

reasoning. There is a famous experiment in which, let me give you an example. A duck is not quite a typical bird. Right? It is atypical, sort of in the middle. The experiment went like this. They had given subjects a bunch of questions, and one question said there is a certain island where all of the

Series:

Laura A. Janda

of Kazan. When we looked at this data, we removed all of the sentences in which the noun was used in the nominative case, basically in subject position, because all nouns can occur in that position, and it wasn’t very interesting and actually it would have overwhelmed the rest of the data and made

Series:

George Lakoff

important area of your life, there is not just one metaphor for it. There are lots of different ones. And they are all different. They all have different modes of reasoning. They are about different subject matter. They mean different things. I would like to point out at this point is something very deep

Series:

Laura A. Janda

count them individually. We did that also in example fifteen. Then we also have the option of having something spread all over and having no clear boundaries or no clear end to it. Certainly this is the way the subject of the sentence feels in number seventeen where we have a woman who is waiting for

Series:

Laura A. Janda

. TAM here of course refers to tense, aspect and mood; linguists often use this abbreviation. In Study One, we’ll look at prefixes and suffixes and ask whether pairs are formed by both prefixes and suffixes, because this is the subject of a long-standing debate in Russian. Perhaps more interesting for