Search Results

"The Original Explosion That Created Worlds"

Essays on Werewere Liking’s Art and Writings

Series:

Edited by John Conteh-Morgan and Irène Assiba d'Almeida

“The Original Explosion That Created Worlds” is the first book entirely devoted to the Cameroonian Werewere Liking, one of the most important writers and innovative artists of post-colonial Africa. The book includes a wide-ranging collection of essays by some of Liking’s finest critics addressing her life and work, from her earlier fiction and social criticism to her later experimental drama, which has been produced on stages around the world. Several essays also look at Liking’s culture-based entrepreneurial work, in which she has attempted to establish a new economic support for African artistic expression.
Liking’s excellent but little-known poetry and art criticism, her iconoclastic novels and essays are all the subject of close critical attention in particular studies. There is also consideration of the challenges that her original language and fictional forms present to a literary translator. Liking’s work has provoked an extensive commentary, in the popular press as well as in scholarly journals and her critical reception both inside and outside of Africa is carefully examined. The final important inclusions are two plays by Liking published here for the first time in English translations– Liquid Heroes and This Africa of ours...
“The Original Explosion That Created Worlds”: Essays on Werewere Liking’s Art and Writings may serve as an introduction to the work of one of Africa’s most important contemporary artists and one of the most astute commentators on the position of Africa in the new century. To those already familiar with Liking’s novels, poetry, plays, criticism or other cultural work it offers an expanded and deepened understanding of her working contexts and the amazing reach of her cultural expression. The book is of necessary interest to all readers, students, and scholars of postcolonial African literatures, of translation studies, and of gender issues.

Series:

Josiah Walters

In A Grammar of Dazaga, Josiah Walters provides the first detailed description and analysis of Dazaga (a Saharan language) in the past half-century. Based on a review of previous work on Dazaga, and with his own more recent data, the author describes the phonology, morphology, and syntax of Dazaga. He provides a new analysis of the categorization of verbs in to classes, demonstrating the prominence of light verb constructions in Dazaga. His analysis of the syntax brings to light several striking features of Dazaga, including optional ergative case marking, mixed alignment of objects, a variety of causative constructions, and verb serialization. Throughout the work, the author relates his findings to work on related languages and to recent typological studies.

Series:

Kathleen Gyssels

Abstract

Tristes Tropiques et “Racial Healing”: Ellen Ombre et Caryl Phillips Rentrent au Pays

In this article, I demonstrate how Phillips and Ombre travel back to West Africa to come to terms with their relationship with “Mother Africa.” During their respective visits to several “lieux de mémoire,” such as Accra and Elmina, they both realize how, while forgetting that the black holocaust and slavery is unacceptable for the descendants of slaves, the ways of “memorizing” observed in those tourist places is equally subject to critique. Their respective “notebooks” testify to the difficulties encountered by Afro-Caribbeans who travel back to Africa and are “welcomed home,” while they feel displacement and distance. Movements such as panafricanism and rastafarism have proven insufficient in helping the post-independent African nations, and the Black Diaspora.

Le Queer Impérial

Male homoerotic desire in francophone colonial and postcolonial literature

Series:

Julin Everett

In Le Queer Impérial Julin Everett explores the taboo subject of male homoerotic desire between black Africans and white Europeans in francophone colonial and postcolonial literatures. Everett exposes the intersection of power and desire in blanc-noir relationships in colonial and postcolonial black Africa and postimperial Europe. Reading these literatures for their portrayals of race, gender and sexuality, Everett begins a conversation about personal and political violence in the face of forbidden desires.

Drawing the Divine Seed

India, Alterity and the Real in the Works of J.M. Coetzee

Anas Tabraiz

variants in representation. Bruce Fink, in his phenomenal study called The Lacanian Subject: Between Language and Jouissance , defines the Lacanian real in ways which are highly evocative of Coetzee’s discussion, in Elizabeth Costello , of the evolution (or reductive transformation) of the biological man

Series:

Julin Everett

represented subject is unaware of or un-consenting to representation. It is surely pertinent in Le Docker noir in which the protagonist loses all power of self-representation and control over the capturing and wide dissemination of his physical image in French newspapers, and in which representations of his

Series:

Julin Everett

masculinity and femininity; on the will of the individual, intersexed subject. One might be satisfied with such an interpretation of gender in Je soussigné cardiaque , were the instances of men taking on feminine personas uniquely life-affirming. Instead, while the motif of men re-imagining themselves as

Series:

Julin Everett

– the special frisson of being somewhere between inside and out, between hidden and revealed, partly expansive and partly enclosed. This is the pleasure of the socially sanctioned secret. Gargi Bhattacharyya, Sexuality and Society: An Introduction 1 ∵ The postcolonial subject does not know his

Series:

Julin Everett

every-day citizen. She follows the late-nineteenth-century French tradition of glorifying the peasant – subjects of her earlier novel – and aligns herself, post-war, with the now popular Resistance. This last affiliation also implies Ginette’s resistance of Diaw’s attempt to penetrate the borders of