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Edited by Mechthild E. Nagel and Anthony J. Nocella

The End of Prisons

Reflections from the Decarceration Movement

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Edited by Mechthild E. Nagel and Anthony J. Nocella II

This book brings together a collection of social justice scholars and activists who take Foucault’s concept of discipline and punishment to explain how prisons are constructed in society from nursing homes to zoos. This book expands the concept of prison to include any institution that dominates, oppresses, and controls. Criminologists and others, who have been concerned with reforming or dismantling the criminal justice system, have mostly avoided to look at larger carceral structures in society. In this book, for example, scholars and activists question the way patriarchy has incapacitated women and imagine the deinstitutionalization of people with disabilities. In a time when popular sentiment critiques the dominant role of the elites (the “one percenters”), the state’s role in policing dissenting voices, school children, LGBTQ persons, people of color, and American Indian Nations, needs to be investigated. A prison, as defined in this book, is an institution or system that oppresses and does not allow freedom for a particular group. Within this definition, we include the imprisonment of nonhuman animals and plants, which are too often overlooked.

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William Allen Brant

necessary for survival, societies, violence, sex etc. Water is involved in legal ownerships of real estate. Yet water is just not an ordinary subject matter of discussion concerning the topic of law and legal systems, even though water is a necessary condition for the emergence of animal life, for

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William Allen Brant

realm of the psychosociological levels of analysis. Sometimes thinking of the methods in sciences, the conditions required with unknowing experimental subjects, and the like are sufficient to guide our understandings of the matters for the formations of worthwhile hypotheses. At present, the concern is

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William Allen Brant

and 3 (see below). Figure 1 is a framework that accounts for the social acceptance of a group within the confines of the legal system to which they are subjected, and the figure functions to illustrate misconceptions that individuals have in relation to what is legal, illegal, and alegal alegal

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William Allen Brant

utilize the same language as Hartmann (1938, pp. 36–37) for this. Hartmann’s philosophy on the subject has also been translated as “contingency” rather than as “coincidence” within the first full translation of Nicolai Hartmann’s magnum opus in English (Hartmann, 2013). The defense lawyer may decide to

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William Allen Brant

Utopia contributes to the subject of sociology of knowledge with an investigation of how humans think in respect to their everyday lives and how it functions within politics as an instrument of collective actions, i.e., as opposed to more utopian ways of thinking thinking ways of thinking that are

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William Allen Brant

the price of labor because it is performed without wages. Volunteer work can be performed by a sustainable system and contribute to sustainability. Banking systems also produce difficulties for such nations. Those who open bank accounts with lesser amounts of money are subjected to more frequent

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William Pencak

The world's longest lasting republic between ancient Rome and modern Switzerland, medieval Iceland (c. 870-1262) centered its national literature, the great family sagas, around the problem of can a republic survive and do justice to its inhabitants. The Conflict of Law and Justice in the Icelandic Sagas takes a semiotic approach to six of the major sagas which depict a nation of free men, abetted by formidable women, testing conflicting legal codes and principles - pagan v. Christian, vengeance v. compromise, monarchy v. republicanism, courts v. arbitration. The sagas emerge as a body of great literature embodying profound reflections on political and legal philosophy because they do not offer simple solutions, but demonstrate the tragic choices facing legal thinkers (Njal), warriors (Gunnar), outlaws (Grettir), women (Gudrun of Laxdaela Saga), priests (Snorri of Eyrbyggja Saga), and the Icelandic community in its quest for stability and a good society. Guest forewords by Robert Ginsberg and Roberta Kevelson, set the book in the contexts of philosophy, semiotics, and Icelandic studies to which it contributes.

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Thomas C. Grey

In Formalism and Pragmatism in American Law Thomas Grey gives a full account of each of these modes of legal thought, with particular attention to the versions of them promulgated by their influential exponents Christopher Columbus Langdell and Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. Grey argues that legal pragmatism as understood by Holmes is the best jurisprudential framework for a modern legal system. He enriches his theoretical account with treatments of central issues in three important areas of law in the United States: constitutional interpretation, property, and torts.