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Series:

Paola Di Rico and Marino Viganò

family traits or inscriptions, and many others could be recognized by the distinctive crests on the subject’s clothing or by their posture. Today, however, they are no longer easily identifiable, as the cues associated with a particular face or family have long been forgotten, and the figures such

Series:

Yasmin Haskell

/ Solis & occasus” ( De motibus , 1:114). 25 Cf. Virgil, Aeneid 1.740–46. 26 Physiognomy was the subject of a short poem by French Jesuit didactic poet, Pierre Bimet (1687–1760), which Brumoy must have known: Physiognomia (Lyon, 1708). Another French Jesuit, Jean Lucas (1638–1716), composed a didactic

Series:

Maya Feile Tomes

emotions? The subject of the present volume is not emotions documented, however, but emotions performed , and it is in this regard that Peramás’s Columbus epic comes into its own. 10 In retreating to the mythico-historical plane, Peramás is afforded (affords himself ) a crucial temporal and thematic

Series:

Nienke Tjoelker

theater. 14 He was a major contributor to the celebrated Journal de Trévoux between 1722 and 1739, of which for some time he was also the editor. He composed several college tragedies on sacred subjects and was the author of the didactic poem De motibus animi (On the passions). 15 His most important

Series:

Juan Luis González García

passion, as well as [those on] other highly emotive subjects. 19 The pagans used this technique, as is demonstrated by the procedure Mark Antony used to stir up the Romans in response to Caesar’s assassination. He brought together the people, told them of the dictator’s good deeds, and then recounted how

Series:

Raphaële Garrod

digest of it, consisting of disputationes and quaestiones on its subject matter, was first printed posthumously in Lyon in 1628: Francisco Suárez, Ad primam secundae D. Thomae tractatus quinque theologici (Lyon: Cardon, 1628). For a survey of Suárez’s account of the soul, see Simo Knuuttila

John Banks’s Female Tragic Heroes

Reimagining Tudor Queens in Restoration She-Tragedy

Series:

Paula de Pando

In John Banks’s Female Tragic Heroes, Paula de Pando offers the first monograph on Restoration playwright John Banks. De Pando analyses Banks’s civic model of she-tragedy in terms of its successful adaptation of early modern literary traditions and its engagement with contemporary political and cultural debates. Using Tudor queens as tragic heroes and specifically addressing female audiences, patrons and critics, Banks made women rather than men the subject of tragedy, revolutionising drama and influencing depictions of gender, politics, and history in the long eighteenth century.

Series:

Christine M. Nilsson

: Routledge, 2006), S. 19–20. 32 “The term Regietheater in the late twentieth century [became] one of the most familiar critical terms in German theatrical discourse and was the subject of countless articles, essays, and books. The majority of these were written in protest against the excesses of Regietheater

Series:

Paula de Pando

. However, he did not confront her with another male protagonist: instead, he chose another woman, Mary Queen of Scots, to share the lead. By presenting two heroines without a consort, Banks continued with his ongoing experiment on subverting gender dynamics on stage as distinctions between subject and

Series:

Paula de Pando

present. In Susan Staves’ words, the rediscovery of British history itself as a subject tended to force playwrights away from abstract confrontations between tyrants and usurpers and into a realization that succession to the British crown itself had not proceeded strictly according to divine right