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Jordan D. Rosenblum

Winston Churchill is reported to have said: “A fanatic is one who can’t change his mind and won’t change the subject.” 1 The ancient rabbis were certainly fanatical about certain things (purity and pagan wine are obvious examples), though they displayed a willingness to change their mind in the

Series:

S. Safrai, M. Stern, D. Flusser and W.C. van Unnik

Doron, Edit

In Hebrew one finds a construction in which an initial noun phrase has the properties associated with a subject, despite apparent similarity to, and in some cases ambiguity with, Left Dislocation (the latter also known as Extraposition). Such an initial noun phrase has been called ‘broad subject

Ziskind

This book contains a lengthy introduction, translation and commentary on John Selden's Uxor Hebraica. Selden was a seventeenth century Christian talmudist, classicist, legal historian and member of the British parliament who wrote extensively on a wide variety of subjects including seven books, all in Latin, of various aspects of Jewish Law. Uxor Hebraica is an exhaustive treatment of Jewish marriage law.
Among the subjects treated are incest (including a unique discussion of the Karaite rules), levirate, the marriage contract and ceremonies and divorce. Selden extensively used the Hebrew Bible, its ancient and later translations, the Talmud, and especially Maimonides' Mishneh Torah. He widened his discussion by including comparative material from the New Testament, church fathers, Greece and Rome, Islam, plus usages from Ethiopia, Russia, Byzantium and medieval Europe. Although written without polemic, the work is clearly related to the religious controversies of the day.

Edited by Dan Diner

This German edition is only available as a set with the English Encyclopedia of Jewish History and Culture Online. The prices mentioned are for the combined bundle of Encyclopedia of Jewish History and Culture Online and Enzyklopädie jüdischer Geschichte und Kultur.

From Europe to America to the Middle East, North Africa and other non-European Jewish settlement areas the Enzyklopädie jüdischer Geschichte und Kultur covers the recent history of the Jews from 1750 until the 1950s.
About 800 keywords present the current state of international research and depict a complex portrait of Jewish life - illustrated by many maps and images. About 40 key articles convey central themes on concepts like autonomy, exile, emancipation, literature, liturgy, music or the science of Judaism. The seventh volume index offers a detailed list of persons, places and subjects that creates a reliable reference for working with the encyclopedia. The encyclopedia provides knowledge in an overall context and offers academics and other interested readers new insights into Jewish history and culture. It is an outstanding contribution to the understanding of Judaism and modernity.

Editor-in-Chief Dan Diner

This online English edition is available as a set alongside the German Enzyklopädie jüdischer Geschichte und Kultur. The prices mentioned are for the combined bundle of Encyclopedia of Jewish History and Culture Online and Enzyklopädie jüdischer Geschichte und Kultur. The English edition will also be available in print.

From Europe to America to the Middle East, North Africa and other non-European Jewish settlement areas the Encyclopedia of Jewish History and Culture covers the recent history of the Jews from 1750 until the 1950s.
Translated from German into English, approximately 800 keywords present the current state of international research and depict a complex portrait of Jewish life - illustrated by many maps and images. About 40 key articles convey central themes on topics like autonomy, exile, emancipation, literature, liturgy, music or the science of Judaism. The seventh volume index offers a detailed list of persons, places and subjects that creates a reliable reference for working with the encyclopedia. The encyclopedia provides knowledge in an overall context and offers academics and other interested readers new insights into Jewish history and culture. It is an outstanding contribution to the understanding of Judaism and modernity.

Oren, Mikhal

In defining the notion of ‘subject’, a distinction must be made between the grammatical and the logical or psychological level (see, for instance, Jespersen 1924:145–154; Lyons 1968:334–343). The grammatical subject of a verbal clause is defined as the element (nominal or pronominal) with which the

Beckman, John C.

The subject of a clause is the noun or noun-substitute to which the predicate of the clause applies. If the predicate is active, then the subject performs the action of the predicate, e.g., בָּרָ֣א אֱלֹהִ֑ים bå̄rå̄ ʾε̌lōhīm ‘God created’ (Gen. 1.1). If the predicate is passive, then the subject