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An Uncertain Fate
Public diplomacy has never been more important in international relations. Yet, public diplomacy’s future as a valued national resource and a respected profession is far from certain. Lingering historical misperceptions and contemporary debate regarding public diplomacy’s role and value in protecting and advancing national and international interests threaten public diplomacy’s advancement on both fronts. Grounded in public relations theory and steeped in common sense, this book advances the global debate on public diplomacy’s future by documenting the intellectual and practical development of public diplomacy in the United States and analyzing key challenges ahead. The author’s fresh perspective provides compelling insights into public diplomacy's purpose and value, the conceptual foundations of the discipline, and principles of strategic practice. Based on extensive primary and secondary research, including a comprehensive survey of veteran U.S. public diplomats, the book reveals lessons learned from the U.S. experience in public diplomacy that will be critical in determining public diplomacy's fate in the United States and throughout the world.
The Functioning and Coherence of EU External Representation in a State-centric environment
The European Union at the United Nations examines the implementation of the Common Foreign and Security Policy (CFSP) regime at the United Nations (UN) in New York. It assesses the functioning and quality of the coordination and representation of EU Member States’ national interests and EU policy aims in the most important international organization. Besides dealing with the effectiveness and coherence of EU representation at the UN, the book scrutinizes the potential of the EU as a single actor in foreign and security affairs, reviews CFSP developments generally, and explores whether the process ‘Europeanization’ is taking place in EU external relations. The qualitative institutional analysis is supported by a comprehensive quantitative evaluation of EU Member States’ voting behavior in the UN General Assembly.

illustrates the promise that single-issue political groups can play in stimulating multilateral diplomacy. Such groups also face pitfalls once that issue achieves prominence and is ‘mainstreamed,’ subjecting single issue groups to disintegrative forces while both more institutionalized groupings and newer

In: Group Politics in UN Multilateralism

challenged the sceptical position adopted by the Secretariat of the NAM and lent moral weight to R2P advocates — since states found it very hard to argue with Rwanda on the subject of genocide prevention. 27 Both of these African states were encouraged by Canada’s Ambassador to the UN, Allan Rock, who

In: Group Politics in UN Multilateralism

issues discussed in this article all reveal attempts to link the particular subject at hand to even wider debates: on prohibitions against violence; on resistance to ‘Westernization’; and on protection of cultural diversity. Diplomats made reference to language used in other declarations or resolutions

In: Group Politics in UN Multilateralism

rules-based inter-state policy coordination occurs is rarely the central focus of global governance scholarship. Multilateralism as an institutional form has been the subject of intense academic scrutiny in the two and a half decades since the end of the Cold War. Almost 30 years ago, Robert Keohane

In: Group Politics in UN Multilateralism

African Union on issues of peace and security in Africa, including the work of the United Nations Office to the African Union (S/2016/780). 9 Throughout the APSA Roadmap, there is consistency as regards the subject of self-reliance in financing and the capacity to plan, deploy, manage, sustain and

In: Group Politics in UN Multilateralism

international lawyers, is that UN General Assembly resolutions do not create international law and that the drafters of the UN Charter knowingly refrained from granting the Assembly such power. 35 Indeed, the same author also argues, Arabs have, for example, invariably subjected the various UN Resolutions

In: Group Politics in UN Multilateralism

/religious identity — has experienced this. Johansson-Nogués shows that the OIC and LAS are quite united on topics such as recognition of Palestine (chapter 15) but subject to some centrifugalism as, for example, the war in Syria progressed (chapter 6). Even the most cohesive, visible and arguably influential

In: Group Politics in UN Multilateralism
In: Africa in the Indian Ocean