Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 12 items for :

  • All: "subject" x
  • Religion in Antiquity x
Clear All

Where Dreams May Come (2 vol. set)

Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World

Series:

Gil Renberg

Where Dreams May Come was the winner of the 2018 Charles J . Goodwin Award of Merit, awarded by the Society for Classical Studies.

In this book, Gil H. Renberg examines the ancient religious phenomenon of “incubation", the ritual of sleeping at a divinity’s sanctuary in order to obtain a prophetic or therapeutic dream. Most prominently associated with the Panhellenic healing god Asklepios, incubation was also practiced at the cult sites of numerous other divinities throughout the Greek world, but it is first known from ancient Near Eastern sources and was established in Pharaonic Egypt by the time of the Macedonian conquest; later, Christian worship came to include similar practices. Renberg’s exhaustive study represents the first attempt to collect and analyze the evidence for incubation from Sumerian to Byzantine and Merovingian times, thus making an important contribution to religious history.

This set consists of two books.

Worlds Full of Signs

Ancient Greek Divination in Context

Series:

Kim Beerden

Worlds Full of Signs compares Greek divination to divinatory practices in Neo-Assyrian Mesopotamia and Republican Rome. It argues that the character of Greek divination differed fundamentally from that of the two comparanda. Ample attention is given to background and method at first. Subsequent chapters discuss the divinatory elements – sign, homo divinans, and text, relating divination to time and uncertainty. This book brings together sources originating from various times and places, questioning these to consider both generalities of ancient divination and specifics of Greek divination. Greek divination was inherently flexible on many levels: these findings should be connected to Greek views on time and the future as well as the relatively low level of divinatory institutionalization.

Series:

Christian H. Bull

to Hermes receiving the “eloquent spirit” in Disc.8–9 . The atmosphere of sanctity persists in the dialogue, as Hermes declines to speak about certain subjects out of fear that his divine discourse might be profaned. The narrative setting of the temple is thus used to give the whole discourse an

Series:

Christian H. Bull

the Ogdoad and Ennead, and indeed the barrier separating the subjects singing the hymn from the recipient of the hymn. The orants present themselves as images of the All, the impression of the fullness, which again is an image of God, and the spirit acts as a kind of outpouring connecting the orants

Series:

Christian H. Bull

demotic—as well as geometry and arithmetic, which serve as the foundation for astrology, the most important art: “If the positions and movements of the stars are subject to careful observation also among certain other nations, they are especially so among the Egyptians.” 76 Curiously, he goes on to state

Series:

Christian H. Bull

frameworks are … the instruments used by the collective memory to reconstruct an image of the past which is in accord, in each epoch, with the predominant thoughts of the society.” 72 Collective memory is not a given, then, but must be reconstructed continuously and is thus subject to the whims and

Series:

Christian H. Bull

KK , war is the foremost hallmark of the period of disorder, as human rulers force their subjects to make war upon each other: “And so, strength accomplished much against weakness, so that the strong killed the powerless by burning them alive even in the sanctuaries, and threw the corpses into the

Series:

Christian H. Bull

unity with the object contemplated, so as to break down the subject-object barrier. It should be emphasized that I do not see the distinction between mysticism and magic as a necessary one. Mysticism is religious if it includes in its practice some form of communication with superhuman beings, and magic

Series:

Christian H. Bull

appear, he or she has still been formally summoned, and may be subject to legal sanctions. The effect of calling a god, angel, or demon, on the other hand, must be said to be wholly psychological, and is implicit in the summoning itself. The perlocutionary effect is that the speaker and an eventual