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Series:

Wido van Peursen

preceding clause. Whether or not it does so, depends on an interplay of two mechanisms: inheritance and blocking. Kalkman identifies the syntactic phenomena that determine these mechanisms, such as constituent order or subject continuity or discontinuity. Another PhD student of Talstra, Oliver Glanz

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Diana Edelman

בגד would be a bet of cause, and the definite article before בגד would be intended to signal possession (Joüon §137f). The logical owner of the clothes would be the subject of the sentence, Michal. 4) Michal first arranged the bed’s canopy (כביר העזים) to obscure a clear view of the contents of

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Mercedes L. García Bachmann

conqueror was far from affection. I am also aware that romantic love is overpriced and culturally-bound. Yet, since I am also culturally bound in this particular case to the “tango connection” that brought me to this subject, at this point I will only look at biblical texts depicting relationships permeated

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Michael Segal

καρδία αὐτοῦ], καὶ εἶπεν (ἐνέγκαι…) (1) King Baltasar …(2) And he was drinking wine, [and his heart was exalted] 27 and he said (to bring the gold and silver vessels …). The name Βαλτασαρ is not repeated at the beginning of v. 2 as in mt /Theod since the subject continues from v. 1. There is no

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Johann Cook

considerable number of issues. A prominent one is that the translator chose to interpret his subject matter rather freely; diversity was therefore an important guiding principle for him. Hence this should act as a critical directing principle for the interpreter. Finally, the warning by Jacobus Naudé should be

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Izak Cornelius

into language. They want neither to be levelled into a ‘history of images’ nor elevated into a ‘history of art’, but to be seen as complex individuals occupying multiple subject positions and identities. 21 There is no need to remind ourselves that in ancient Israel there were images and that these

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Edited by Koert van Bekkum, Jaap Dekker, Henk van de Kamp and Eric Peels

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Edited by Koert van Bekkum, Jaap Dekker, Henk R. van den Kamp and Eric Peels

Since ancient times Leviathan and other monsters from the biblical world symbolize the life-threatening powers in nature and history. They represent the dark aspects of human nature and political entities and reveal the supernatural dimensions of evil. Ancient texts and pictures regarding these monsters reflect an environment of polytheism and religious pluralism. Remarkably, however, the biblical writings and post-biblical traditions use these venerated symbols in portraying God as being sovereign over the entire universe, a theme that is also prominent in the reception of these texts in subsequent contexts.
This volume explores this tension and elucidates the theological and cultural meaning of ‘Leviathan’ by studying its ancient Near Eastern background and its attestation in biblical texts, early and rabbinic Judaism, Christian theology, Early Modern art, and film.

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Jacqueline E. Lapsley

who advocate an end to torture would surely agree that it is not okay to torture animals, either. Yet animals in our sanctioned industrial systems of food production are routinely legally subjected to treatment that mirrors the practices of torture. The solution to this problem is not to deny the