Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 19 items for :

  • All: "subject" x
  • Religious Studies x
Clear All

Series:

Edited by Christian Frevel and Christophe Nihan

Envisioning Magic

A Princeton Seminar and Symposium

Series:

Edited by Peter Schäfer and Hans Kippenberg

This collection of twelve articles presents a selection of papers delivered in the course of a seminar 1994-95 and its concluding international symposium at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. The common theme is the interrelation between magic and religion, focussing particularly on the Mediterranean world in Antiquity - Egyptian, Graeco-Roman and Jewish beliefs and customs - but also treating the early modern period in Northern Europe (the Netherlands and Germany) as well as offering more general reflections on elements of magic in language and Jewish mysticism. The volume is characterized by an interdisciplinary approach and the use of varied methodologies, emphasizing the dynamic nature of the often contradictory forces shaping religious beliefs and practices, while dismissing the idea of a linear development from magic to religion or vice versa. The contributors are outstanding scholars in their fields: Ancient, Medieval and Modern History, Religious Studies, Jewish Studies, Classical Studies, Early Christianity, Islamic Studies, Anthropology, Egyptology and Comparative Literature. Without a doubt this re-evaluation of a fascinating age-old subject will stimulate scholarly discussion and appeal to educated non-specialist readers as well.

Secrecy and Concealment

Studies in the History of Mediterranean and Near Eastern Religions

Series:

Edited by Hans Kippenberg and Guy Stroumsa

This volume deals with secrecy and concealment in the history of mediterranean religions as pattern of social interaction. Secrecy is a powerful means in establishing identity and interaction as G. Simmel has demonstrated. Using his approach the scholars of this volume describe and explain the practical meaning of concealment in two different religious systems: in Egyptian and Greek polytheism and in Jewish, Christian, Gnostic and Shi'i monotheisms. This point of view reveals that all these religions shaped social norms concerning public and private aspects of the human self.

Worlds Full of Signs

Ancient Greek Divination in Context

Series:

Kim Beerden

Worlds Full of Signs compares Greek divination to divinatory practices in Neo-Assyrian Mesopotamia and Republican Rome. It argues that the character of Greek divination differed fundamentally from that of the two comparanda. Ample attention is given to background and method at first. Subsequent chapters discuss the divinatory elements – sign, homo divinans, and text, relating divination to time and uncertainty. This book brings together sources originating from various times and places, questioning these to consider both generalities of ancient divination and specifics of Greek divination. Greek divination was inherently flexible on many levels: these findings should be connected to Greek views on time and the future as well as the relatively low level of divinatory institutionalization.

Series:

Christian H. Bull

demotic—as well as geometry and arithmetic, which serve as the foundation for astrology, the most important art: “If the positions and movements of the stars are subject to careful observation also among certain other nations, they are especially so among the Egyptians.” 76 Curiously, he goes on to state

Series:

Christian H. Bull

frameworks are … the instruments used by the collective memory to reconstruct an image of the past which is in accord, in each epoch, with the predominant thoughts of the society.” 72 Collective memory is not a given, then, but must be reconstructed continuously and is thus subject to the whims and

Series:

Christian H. Bull

KK , war is the foremost hallmark of the period of disorder, as human rulers force their subjects to make war upon each other: “And so, strength accomplished much against weakness, so that the strong killed the powerless by burning them alive even in the sanctuaries, and threw the corpses into the

Series:

Christian H. Bull

unity with the object contemplated, so as to break down the subject-object barrier. It should be emphasized that I do not see the distinction between mysticism and magic as a necessary one. Mysticism is religious if it includes in its practice some form of communication with superhuman beings, and magic

Series:

Christian H. Bull

appear, he or she has still been formally summoned, and may be subject to legal sanctions. The effect of calling a god, angel, or demon, on the other hand, must be said to be wholly psychological, and is implicit in the summoning itself. The perlocutionary effect is that the speaker and an eventual