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Edited by Koert van Bekkum, Jaap Dekker, Henk van de Kamp and Eric Peels

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Edited by Koert van Bekkum, Jaap Dekker, Henk R. van den Kamp and Eric Peels

Since ancient times Leviathan and other monsters from the biblical world symbolize the life-threatening powers in nature and history. They represent the dark aspects of human nature and political entities and reveal the supernatural dimensions of evil. Ancient texts and pictures regarding these monsters reflect an environment of polytheism and religious pluralism. Remarkably, however, the biblical writings and post-biblical traditions use these venerated symbols in portraying God as being sovereign over the entire universe, a theme that is also prominent in the reception of these texts in subsequent contexts.
This volume explores this tension and elucidates the theological and cultural meaning of ‘Leviathan’ by studying its ancient Near Eastern background and its attestation in biblical texts, early and rabbinic Judaism, Christian theology, Early Modern art, and film.

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Terence E. Fretheim

. God is able to recall a past that God has experienced with Israel. It may be said that God has “total recall” of this past, and experiences ongoing effects of that past, but, still, that God is the subject of the verb “remember” indicates that the past is truly past to God. 2.2 God “Thought” I thought

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David J. Reimer

reasons for its eclipse in modern thought, and subjects this displacement to philosophical scrutiny. 2 Twenty years on from that work, two of the factors he identified as contributing to the neglect of place – eclipsed by “time and space” – stand out as both percipient and prescient: forced migrations

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Gillian Greenberg

used with a plural subject. Two further examples in brief: in Jer 2:25 and 18:12 the MT reads “There is no hope,” with the root יאש . Both translators have instead understood this as the root איש , “to be of substance/ strong,” a confusion which could readily be made: in 2:25, P reads “I have

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Andrew G. Shead

Wortereignisformel ‎ אלי‎ דבר־יהוה‎ ויהי ‎ has been adapted to enable it to stand as a second title (‎ אליו‎ דבר־יהוה‎ היה‎ אשר ‎, 1:2) without being read as a second and subsequent statement. 83 Two subjects are being closely identified, and in contrast to G, where both those subjects are the word of God, 84

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Herbert B. Huffmon

Jehu’s Coup , BJS 311 (Atlanta: Scholars, 1997), 47. She mentions Jehonadab’s “symbolic role” as “the only possible populist element of the overthrow.” 16 Note that 2 Kgs 10:23 begins with a singular verb followed by a compound subject (that is, both Jehu and Jehonadab entered the temple) and that

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Michael Avioz

by Nebuzaradan: according to Josephus, when Nebuchadrezzar sentences Zedekiah, he tells him that “the great God, hating your behavior, has made you subject to us” ( Ant . 10.139). Unlike the biblical record, where responsibility is placed upon the whole people, Josephus blames Zedekiah alone for the

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Joy A. Schroeder

books such as Genesis, the New Testament gospels, and the letters of Paul, or brief books such as Lamentations. 4 The reason for the paucity of Jeremiah commentaries may have been the difficulty of the subject matter, the scarcity of patristic source material on Jeremiah for the medieval authors to