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Joshua S. Mostow

The Rhetoric of Photography in Modern Japanese Literature

Materiality in the Visual Register as Narrated by Tanizaki Jun’ichirō, Abe Kōbō, Horie Toshiyuki and Kanai Mieko

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Atsuko Sakaki

In The Rhetoric of Photography in Modern Japanese Literature, Atsuko Sakaki closely examines photography-inspired texts by four Japanese novelists: Tanizaki Jun’ichirō (1886-1965), Abe Kōbō (1924-93), Horie Toshiyuki (b. 1964) and Kanai Mieko (b. 1947). As connoisseurs, practitioners or critics of this visual medium, these authors look beyond photographs’ status as images that document and verify empirical incidents and existences, articulating instead the physical process of photographic production and photographs’ material presence in human lives. This book offers insight into the engagement with photography in Japanese literary texts as a means of bringing forgotten subject-object dynamics to light. It calls for a fundamental reconfiguration of the parameters of modern print culture and its presumption of the transparency of agents of representation.

Series:

Roberta Strippoli

-known variant, called the Kakuichibon , has been translated into English several times. I have used Royall Tyler’s and Helen McCullough’s translations, depending on which one seemed better suited to the subject under discussion. Unless specifically noted, all other translations of primary sources are mine. I

Series:

Roberta Strippoli

mention just a few. 3 Drawing subject matter from earlier works was an established practice in premodern Japanese culture; even so, the number of noh plays inspired by these texts is striking. 4 In addition to the number of plays, we should note their persistence. These plays were composed over the

Series:

Roberta Strippoli

, even if subject to Kiyomori, are not afraid of challenging his authority both in word and in action. Hotoke knocks uninvited at the front door of the most powerful man in the country; when Kiyomori sends her away, Giō intervenes, reminding him that performers should be treated with respect. When

Series:

Roberta Strippoli

that women were defiled, for example, and the belief (perceived to different degrees in medieval Japan) that pollution, even if only spiritual, was contagious. 34 Regarded as descendants of itinerant groups that had no fixed abode, did not cultivate land, and were not subject to taxation, and

Dancer, Nun, Ghost, Goddess

The Legend of Giō and Hotoke in Japanese Literature, Theater, Visual Arts, and Cultural Heritage

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Roberta Strippoli

Dancer, Nun, Ghost, Goddess explores the story of the dancers Giō and Hotoke, which first appeared in the fourteenth-century narrative Tale of the Heike. The story of the two love rivals is one of loss, female solidarity, and Buddhist salvation. Since its first appearance, it has inspired a stream of fiction, theatrical plays, and visual art works. These heroines have become the subjects of lavishly illustrated hand scrolls, ghosts on the noh stage, and Buddhist and Shinto goddesses. Physical monuments have been built to honor their memories; they are emblems of local pride and centerpieces of shared identity. Two beloved characters in the Japanese literary imagination, Giō and Hotoke are also models that have instructed generations of women on how to survive in a male-dominated world.

Series:

Roberta Strippoli

alive. Visual Representations of the Giō-Hotoke Story Along with poetry, narrative, and theater, the visual arts also enjoyed a time of exceptional development in the Tokugawa period. Images inspired by the Heike monogatari had already been the subjects of works on paper such as manuscript scrolls and