Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 48 items for :

  • All: "subject" x
  • Literature & Culture x
  • Literature, Arts & Science x
Clear All

The Rhetoric of Photography in Modern Japanese Literature

Materiality in the Visual Register as Narrated by Tanizaki Jun’ichirō, Abe Kōbō, Horie Toshiyuki and Kanai Mieko

Series:

Atsuko Sakaki

In The Rhetoric of Photography in Modern Japanese Literature, Atsuko Sakaki closely examines photography-inspired texts by four Japanese novelists: Tanizaki Jun’ichirō (1886-1965), Abe Kōbō (1924-93), Horie Toshiyuki (b. 1964) and Kanai Mieko (b. 1947). As connoisseurs, practitioners or critics of this visual medium, these authors look beyond photographs’ status as images that document and verify empirical incidents and existences, articulating instead the physical process of photographic production and photographs’ material presence in human lives. This book offers insight into the engagement with photography in Japanese literary texts as a means of bringing forgotten subject-object dynamics to light. It calls for a fundamental reconfiguration of the parameters of modern print culture and its presumption of the transparency of agents of representation.

Series:

Julian Meyrick

1994 was also the year the painter John Brack retired. From the 1950s onwards, Brack had been an acute observer of the Australian scene, producing a range of satirical portraits, nudes, and subject-paintings, of which Collins St, 5pm (1955) is probably the best known. After returning from a trip

Series:

Julian Meyrick

the manoeuvring of practitioners involves both subject positions and regimes of power. In this book, re-introducing the subject into history while avoiding the simplifications of grand narrative involves drawing on the work of French philosopher Alain Badiou. A word about Badiou. His writings are

Series:

Julian Meyrick

changed. Like a dense ball of matter waiting to unfurl, subjects hold within themselves a new universe of possibility. After that, the question is what to do about it. 3 Leaving aside whether anything that has happened in Australian theatre qualifies as an event in the strict sense that Badiou defines it

Series:

Julian Meyrick

up ‘possibility spaces’ for the extension of art form support in a variety of directions … [and] more pluralist constructions of arts product and practice. (2001: 106–07) The cab ’s remit were the people left out of conventional policy thinking: ‘non-appreciative subjects’, those who would not or

Series:

Julian Meyrick

the box office – shy of its target of $28,800. The year’s total was also down, $74,780 as against an estimated $97,400. If the company’s audacity and imagination were on display, so were the problems of finance and organisation that dogged its efforts. “A more prudent director might have subjected the

Fang Xudong (方旭东)

good precepts, no one would remonstrate with the monarch on this subject. It can be deduced from this opinion that Mencius certainly considered the king of Qi unqualified to consult on the precepts of benevolence and righteousness. However, this would imply that Mencius regarded his ruler as being

The Heavens are High and the Emperor is Near: An Imperial Power System that is Open to the People

The Interaction and Representation of the Complicated Relationship between the Emperors and the People in Qin and Han Dynasties

Lei Ge

the relation between the emperor and the officials, which itself was in turn subordinate to the relation between the emperor and the people. An official is first the emperor’s subject, and only then is he empowered to represent the emperor to rule the people. If he self-assertively speaks for the

Wenxin Chen and Tianbi Gao

During the final phase of a declining political order, during troubled times, or under other exceptional circumstances, concord between outsider scholars and political authority is easily ruptured. The psychology of scholars and certain actors who were subject to the same “authority” pressure thus came to rest on a common foundation. Zhang Dai’s Recollections of Tao-an’s Past Dreams (Tao’an mengyi 陶庵夢憶) can be seen as a manifestation of the relationship between scholars and actors in troubled times. Through a deep analysis of the text of “Dream Recollections of Tao An,” we can see scholars beginning to have an emotional appreciation for the independence and individuality of the actors. At the same time, a certain self-consciousness of the actors was awakened, whereby the actors provided spiritual and material support to the scholars during this difficult period. The performance of many scholars in amateur theatrical shows also meant that the status of low-ranking scholars and actors was not significantly different. This new scholar-actor relationship is inseparable from the thought, politics and economics of the late Ming and early Qing period, and should be understood in just such a context.

Zhang Jinguang †

king’s land,” “the king’s subjects,” and “the king’s power.” These are the three guiding principles for state power in ancient China, with the king’s land being the paramount principle. These three principles are of the same nature. They collectively define the ultimate and ever-present state power