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Waters of the Exodus

Jewish Experiences with Water in Ptolemaic and Roman Egypt

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Nathalie LaCoste

In Waters of the Exodus, Nathalie LaCoste examines the Diasporic Jewish community in Ptolemaic and Roman Egypt and their relationship to the hydric environment. By focusing on four retellings of the exodus narrative composed by Egyptian Jews—Artapanus, Ezekiel the Tragedian, Wisdom of Solomon, and Philo of Alexandria—she lays out how the hydric environment of Egypt, and specifically the Nile river, shaped the transmission of the exodus story. Mapping these observations onto the physical landscape of Egypt provides a new perspective on the formation of Jewish communities in Egypt.

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Nathalie LaCoste

of Religion 9.2 (1997): 111–26. 37 Horden and Purcell, The Corrupting Sea , 45. 38 Veronica Strang, The Meaning of Water (Oxford: Berg, 2004), 5: “Human-environmental relations are also subject to ecological constraints and physiological and biological needs. As the substance that is literally

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Nathalie LaCoste

ideas presented here are twofold; Osiris as the god of the dead (and the afterlife) was linked to water in the sense of purification and preparation of the deceased for the afterlife. For more on this subject, see Centrone, “This is the Form,” 357; J. Gwyn Griffiths, The Origins of Osiris and his Cult

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Edited by Hindy Najman and Konrad Schmid

Jeremiah’s Scriptures

Production, Reception, Interaction, and Transformation

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Edited by Hindy Najman and Konrad Schmid

Jeremiah’s Scriptures focuses on the composition of the biblical book of Jeremiah and its dynamic afterlife in ancient Jewish traditions. Jeremiah is an interpretive text that grew over centuries by means of extensive redactional activities on the part of its tradents. In addition to the books within the book of Jeremiah, other books associated with Jeremiah or Baruch were also generated. All the aforementioned texts constitute what we call “Jeremiah's Scriptures.” The papers and responses collected here approach Jeremiah’s scriptures from a variety of perspectives in biblical and ancient Jewish sub-fields. One of the authors' goals is to challenge the current fragmentation of the fields of theology, biblical studies, ancient Judaism. This volume focuses on Jeremiah and his legacy.

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Cana Werman

that the covenant is to be made with only one of Isaac’s son, Jubilees rewrites Gen 17:16. In the biblical version, Sarah is the only subject in the verse: “And I will bless her and will give you a son from her. And I will bless her and she will become nations and kings of people will come out of her

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Devorah Dimant

1 Introduction The opposition between concealing and revealing is one of the major concerns of Qumran sectarian literature, but it has not yet been the subject of a systematic analysis. Research has usually concentrated on the terms רז and סוד (“mystery,” and “secret”), 1 often comparing them

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Beate Ego

Jerusalem and its cosmological meaning in the Hebrew Bible. 7 However, it seems to be a research desideratum to subject the cosmological ideas contained in the Dead Sea Scrolls to a rereading, and to consider them with regard to their functions in the religious symbol system in which they participate