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The Kābôd of Yhwh in the Old Testament

with Particular Reference to the Book of Ezekiel

Series:

P. de Vries

In this study on the kābôd of YHWH biblical texts are approached from a canonical perspective, and the synchronic approach prevails over the diachronic. Ben Sira characterized Ezekiel as the prophet who saw the appearance of the glory of God. This characterization is not based on the number of occurrences of kābôd in Ezekiel. The peculiarity of Ezekiel is that kābôd is used almost exclusively as a hypostasis of YHWH. Ezekiel’s description of the kābôd of YHWH is more elaborate than any other Old Testament writer’s, and it highlights the dual and paradoxical nature of the divine kābôd as both defying verbal description and being potentially visible. This research highlights especially the importance of the visible aspect.

Series:

Johan de Joode

This introduction explains what spatial metaphors are and why they are the subject of this study. As a point of departure, I investigate a number of spatial expressions in the prologue of the book of Job that are generally not considered to be metaphorical. These expressions are linguistic

Series:

Johan de Joode

. the direction is from source to target domain and the mapping cannot be inverted. Not all metaphor theorists agree with the idea that a mapping is unidirectional. Max Black notably has argued for an interaction view of metaphor in which “the two subjects ‘interact’ in the following ways: (a) the

Series:

Johan de Joode

were subjected to systematic analysis in the body of the present study. These three metaphorical clusters have different spatial categories as source domains: 1. BOUNDARIES and CONTAINMENT , 2. PLACE and PLACELESSNESS , and 3. DIRECTION and DISTANCE . To investigate these metaphors I

Series:

Johan de Joode

, and Job is not.” 39 Despite the evidence of that insight, as readers we “begin to argue among ourselves.” 40 For Newsom, the key element in Job’s experience is that of the sublime, viz. “the perceiving subject’s sense of being overwhelmed by something too immense, vast, or powerful to be grasped by

Series:

Johan de Joode

subject is that ill-being and well-being are different dimensions, viz. although they might be thought of as direct opposites, they are influenced by different needs. 10 Tay and Diener studied the correlation between subjective well-being and needs. 11 The six needs they postulate are the following

Series:

Johan de Joode

Job always stayed away from evil as far as possible. After the events, he phrases his disillusion as follows: In (11) רע ‘evil’ comes to Job. He was the subject, now he is the object. The correlation between the conceptualization of steering away from evil and having evil come to oneself is highly