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Views from the Global Arena
The European Union officially acquired international legal personality with the entry into force of the Lisbon Treaty. Since then, the constitutional foundations of EU external relations have received an ever-greater amount of scholarly attention. So far however, the body of knowledge has remained limited with regard to how the Union is actually being perceived on the global scene. Moreover, its dealings with other international organizations constitute a similar, still underexplored topic. The European Union's Emerging International Identity breaks new ground by addressing both these themes in combination. The resulting volume offers an innovative inquiry into the EU’s image and status, based on a select number of studies of its position and functioning within the framework of eight international organizations.
From the Public Law of Europe to Global International Law?
International Law in the Long Nineteenth Century gathers ten studies that reflect the ever-growing variety of themes and approaches that scholars from different disciplines bring to the historiography of international law in the period.

Three themes are explored: ‘international law and revolutions’ which reappraises the revolutionary period as crucial to understanding the dynamics of international order and law in the nineteenth century. In ‘law and empire’, the traditional subject of nineteenth-century imperialism is tackled from the perspective of both theory and practice. Finally, ‘the rise of modern international law’, covers less familiar aspects of the formation of modern international law as a self-standing discipline.

Contributors are: Camilla Boisen, Raphaël Cahen, James Crawford, Ana Delic, Frederik Dhondt, Andrew Fitzmaurice, Vincent Genin, Viktorija Jakjimovska, Stefan Kroll, Randall Lesaffer, and Inge Van Hulle.
Legal Framework for Combating Threats and Crises
Editors: Inge Govaere and Sara Poli
EU Management of Global Emergencies: Legal Framework for Combating Threats and Crises provides a thorough analysis of the role played by the European Union (EU) in combating some of the global emergencies that currently affect, or are likely to affect, our planet. In particular, the potential of a “regional” model for coping with such emergencies is examined, taking into account the perceived inefficacy of traditional prevention and reaction mechanisms provided both by individual States and international organisations. The expression “global emergencies” refers to all situations, irrespective of the subject matter involved, which are characterised by an unexpected state of crisis which affects one or more regions of the world and call for an urgent and coordinated response from competent bodies and institutions.

Furthermore, the book tests the role of the EU in managing global emergencies with respect to four broad areas: the economic and financial crises, the protection of the environment, terrorism and humanitarian aid, while maintaining focus on the legal framework within which the EU deals with such global emergencies in the light of the innovations brought about by the Lisbon Treaty.

With contributions by leading experts in each of the identified set of challenges, EU Management of Global Emergencies: Legal Framework for Combating Threats and Crises aims at increasing the understanding of : (a) the contribution of regional organizations such as the EU to the management of global emergencies; (b) the effectiveness of the EU external action and the actual involvement of the EU in global cooperation processes against global emergencies; (c) global standards of human rights protection in relation to measures adopted in crises; and (d) the coordination mechanisms between the EU and other international organisations with a global or regional membership, in the management of global emergencies.

Contracting Party” shall, in relation to the Republic of China, mean all persons who are Chinese citizens by virtue of the Chinese nationality laws; and in relation to the Kingdom of the Netherlands, mean all persons being Netherlands subjects by virtue of the Netherlands nationality laws. Article 2 All

In: Forgotten Diplomacy

signed between Britain and the Qing in 1842–1843 provided for the opening of five Chinese ports to foreign trade, tariff exemptions, and immunity from Chinese laws for British subjects. 3 The United States and France soon followed suit, exacting similar privileges offering legal immunity and consular

In: Forgotten Diplomacy

crossed at this instance, hitting a rare equilibrium point in what historically had been an uneven relationship. How these momentous encounters and historic transformations ultimately charted a new course for their bilateral ties is the subject of this book. 1 Dutch Diplomatic History Dutch diplomatic

In: Forgotten Diplomacy

tariffs and abolished all Dutch nonreciprocal rights in this context, subject only to the principle of nondiscrimination (most favored nation). From 1928 to 1930, the Nanjing government concluded similar instruments with 12 other treaty powers. However, owing to delays in the ratification process, the

In: Forgotten Diplomacy

Japanese puppet regimes, the inland city of Chongqing would serve as the capital of “free” China throughout the remainder of the war. Between 1939 and 1944, Japanese forces subjected the city to massive, indiscriminate air raids, unprecedented at that time in terms of magnitude, impact, and duration, known

In: Forgotten Diplomacy

director of European and African affairs of the Waijiaobu, Huan Xiang 宦乡, the latter read out a statement to the effect that the establishment of diplomatic relations between the two governments could not be subject to any condition and that the Chinese government would determine its position vis-à-vis the

In: Forgotten Diplomacy

were those of a tall European subject “of the Nordic type.” Inscriptions on the wedding ring found on the left hand removed any doubt that this was the body of François Bourdrez. 197 All surviving official documents, including the autopsy report, list 11 May as the date of his death. However, it was

In: Forgotten Diplomacy