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Christian Arabic Versions of Daniel

A Comparative Study of Early MSS and Translation Techniques in MSS Sinai Ar. 1 and 2

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Miriam Lindgren Hjälm

In Christian Arabic Versions of Daniel, Miriam L. Hjälm provides an insight into the Arabic transmission of the biblical Book of Daniel. This book offers an inventory and a classification of extant manuscripts as well as a detailed account of the translation techniques employed in the early manuscripts. The use of the texts is discussed and the various versions are compared with liturgical Bible material.

Miriam L. Hjälm shows the importance of Arabic as a tool for understanding the development of the religious heritage of Christian communities under Muslim rule. Arabic became an indispensable part of the everyday life of many Near Eastern Christians and was increasingly used next to the established liturgical languages, which remained the standard measure of the biblical text.



The Samaritan Version of Saadya Gaon’s Translation of the Pentateuch

Critical Edition and Study of MS London BL OR7562 and Related MSS

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Tamar Zewi

This edition of MS London BL OR7562 and other related MSS, and the accompanying linguistic and philological study, discuss a Samaritan adaptation of Saadya’s Judeo-Arabic translation of the Pentateuch, its main characteristics and place among other early Medieval Arabic Bible translations, viz., other versions of Saadya’s translation of the Pentateuch, other Samaritan Arabic versions of the Pentateuch, and Christian and Karaite Arabic Bible translations. The study analyses the various components of this version, its transmission, its language, the extent to which the Samaritans adapted this version of Saadya’s translation to their own version of the Hebrew Pentateuch, and their possible motives in choosing it for their own use.

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Edited by Kevork B. Bardakjian and Sergio La Porta

The Armenian Apocalyptic Tradition

A Comparative Perspective

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Edited by Kevork Bardakjian and Sergio La Porta

The Armenian Apocalyptic Tradition: A Comparative Perspective comprises a collection of essays on apocalyptic literature in the Armenian tradition. This collection is unprecedented in its subject and scope and employs a comparative approach that situates the Armenian apocalyptic tradition within a broader context. The topics in this volume include the role of apocalyptic literature and apocalypticism in the conversion of the Armenians to Christianity, apocalyptic ideology and holy war, the significance of the Book of Daniel in Armenian thought, the reception of the Apocalypse of Ps.-Methodius in Armenian, the role of apocalyptic literature in political ideologies, and the expression of apocalypticism in the visual arts.

Scrinium

Journal of Patrology and Critical Hagiography

NEW! NOW PUBLISHED IN OPEN ACCESS. For the years 2018-2020 all articles in Scrinium are published as full open access articles. There are no submission charges and no Article Processing Charges as these are fully funded by institutions through Knowledge Unlatched, resulting in no direct charge to authors.
Scrinium: Journal of Patrology and Critical Hagiography, established in 2005, is an international scholarly periodical devoted to patristics, critical hagiography, and Church history. Its scope is the ancient and medieval Christian Church worldwide, but especially Eastern / Oriental Christianity and Christian Origins. Each volume is focused on a specific subject (covering no less than 60% of the whole volume) formulated in the individual title of each volume.

Scrinium is a single-blind peer-reviewed journal.

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Early Christian-Muslim Debate on the Unity of God

Three Christian Scholars and Their Engagement with Islamic Thought (9th Century C.E.)

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Sara Leila Husseini

Early Christian-Muslim Debate on the Unity of God examines the writings of three of the earliest known Christian theologians to write comprehensive theological works in Arabic. Theodore Abū Qurra, Abū Rā’iṭa and ‘Ammār al-Baṣrī provide valuable insight into early Christian-Muslim debate shortly after the rise of the Islamic empire.
Through close examination of their writings on the doctrine of the Trinity, Sara Husseini demonstrates the creativity of these theologians, who make use of language, style and argumentation characteristic of Islamic theological thought (kalām), in order to help articulate their long-established religious truths. Husseini offers close analysis of the authors individually and comparatively, exploring their engagement with Islamic theology and their role in this fascinating period.