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In Corruption and Targeted Sanctions, Anton Moiseienko analyses the blacklisting of foreigners suspected of corruption and the prohibition of their entry into the sanctioning state from an international law perspective. The implications of such actions have been on the international agenda for years and have gained particular prominence with the adoption by the US and Canada of the so-called Magnitsky legislation in 2016. Across the Atlantic, several European states followed suit. The proliferation of anti-corruption entry sanctions has prompted a reappraisal of applicable human rights safeguards, along with issues of respect for official immunities and state sovereignty. On the basis of a comprehensive review of relevant law and policy, Anton Moiseienko identifies how targeted sanctions can ensure accountability for corruption while respecting international law.

1 Introduction 1 United Nations (UN) targeted sanctions have often been viewed as a paradox. While they are important tools for the protection of global peace and security, they have also been found to infringe certain human rights. The UN Security Council ( unsc ) enjoys powers under Chapter

In: Security and Human Rights
In European Judicial Responses to Security Council Resolutions: A Consequentialist Assessment, Kushtrim Istrefi examines the multiple effects of European courts decisions as regards Security Council targeted sanctions and security detentions interfering with fundamental rights. He elaborates what type of judicial responses ensured real and practical respect for human rights for the petitioners, encouraged Security Council due process reform, clarified Security Council authorisations on security detentions, and tested the primacy and universal character of the UN Charter.
Making use of legal and non-legal instruments, Istrefi sheds some light upon what happened to, among others, petitioners, the SC due process reform agenda, and the UN Charter after such cases as Kadi, Al-Jedda, Ahmed, Al-Dulimi.
In: Coexistence, Cooperation and Solidarity (2 vols.)
This collection of essays—written by friends and colleagues of Joakim Dungel—focuses on the protection of the innocent during and after war. It is a tribute to Joakim’s life and work. Joakim made a significant contribution to international justice and the rule of law, through his service to the United Nations International Criminal Tribunals for the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda, the Special Court for Sierra Leone, the Temporary International Presence in Hebron, and the United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan. He was also a prolific author and published scholarly works on a wide range of issues, including command responsibility, national security interests, the right to humanitarian assistance during internal armed conflicts, and crimes against humanity. This book continues Joakim’s work with in-depth analyses of a variety of issues arising under modern conflict, such as the application of international humanitarian law and international human rights law to aerial drone attacks, targeted sanctions, and reparations to victims. Joakim understood these complex and interlinked issues and dedicated his professional life to engaging with them. Through his work and his scholarship, he demonstrated the crucial importance of adopting victim-centred approaches to dealing with the consequences of armed conflict and to its prevention. This was also why he chose to work for the United Nations as a human rights officer in Afghanistan. This book attempts to honour and affirm Joakim’s choice.
Author: Simon Adams

diverse population without discrimination and regardless of ethnicity, religion or citizenship status’. It also called for ‘prompt, concerted and effective international action’, including an arms embargo and targeted sanctions against ‘senior officers responsible for crimes against humanity or other

In: Global Responsibility to Protect
The Max Planck Yearbook of United Nations Law (UNYB), founded in 1997, appears under the auspices of the Max Planck Foundation for International Peace and the Rule of Law. It has a three-tier structure: The first part, ‘The Law and Practice of the United Nations’, concentrates on the legal fundamentals of the UN, its Specialized Agencies and Programmes. The second part, ‘Legal Issues Related to the Goals of the United Nations’, analyzes achievements with regard to fulfilling the main objectives of the UN. The third part consists of an overview of the key developments at the UN for the reporting year. The UNYB addresses both scholars and practitioners, giving them insights into the workings, challenges and evolution of the UN.
The Yearbook is now available online. Learn more about the electronic product here: www.brill.com/max-planck-yearbook-united-nations-law-online

Contributors: Yasser Abdelrehim, Pia Acconci, Lance Bartholomeusz, Hermann-Josef Blanke, Shane Chalmers, Benjamin Davy, Ulrike Davy, Eric De Brabandere, Georgios Dimitropoulos, Juan Camilo Fandiño-Bravo, Jeremy Farrall, Sophie Fink, Elisa Freiburg, Brian E. Frenkel, Robin Geiss, Ezequiel Heffes, Ronald Janse, Marcos D. Kotlik, Frauke Lachenmann, Lutz Leisering, Frédérique Lozanorios, Fruzsina Molnár-Gábor, Jessica Pressler, Tilmann J. Röder, Maximilian Spohr, Mindia Vashakmadze, Martin Wählisch, Edith Wagner, Astrid Wiik, Daniel Wisehart.

, the less discretion the EU legislator enjoys and the stricter judicial scrutiny will be’ 90 . This has been the position, at least, in the case law regarding terrorism and targeted sanctions 91 . 5 Transposition of International Counterterrorism Measures by Member States Ultimately, Member

In: European Journal of Crime, Criminal Law and Criminal Justice

prosecutions of international crimes; ‘moral’ accountability gives effect to the right to truth and ‘political’ accountability includes naming and shaming, lustration, targeted sanctions, memorialisation, compensation to victims, and guarantees of non-recurrence. 12 This typology indicates the

In: The Roles and Functions of Atrocity-Related United Nations Commissions of Inquiry in the International Legal Order