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Maria Schubert

Umgang der US-Regierung mit den Panthers as „a calculated design of genocide“ as „brutal as Nazi Germany“. Zitiert in: Staub, Michael E.: Black Panthers, New Journalism, and the Rewriting of the Sixties, in: Representations 57 (1997), S. 52–72, hier 59. 215 Hübener beschreibt Abernathy als „farblos

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Maria Schubert

American History 96, 1 (2011), S. 1–13; Oppel, Christina: W. E. B. Du Bois, Nazi Germany, and the Black Atlantic, in: German Historical Institute Bulletin Supplement 5 (2008), S. 99–122. Biografien, die ebenfalls Du Bois’ Beziehungen zu den deutschen Staaten behandeln: Horne: Black and Red; Marable

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Maria Schubert

I have seen the real Germany , the human Germany , humane Germany . Those who are inheritors , yes, of Beethoven’s „Alle Menschen werden Brüder.“ 1 PAUL ROBESON über die DDR, 1960 ∵ Paul Robeson war einer der bedeutendsten afroamerikanischen Künstler und politischen Aktivisten des zwanzigsten

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Maria Schubert

Roland Hayes, ein weiterer Kontakt aus den USA, erteilte hingegen aufgrund ähnlicher Befürchtungen keine Einwilligung: „Because of the unfortunate political situation which exists today in East Germany, I have decided to refuse your permission to use any part of my book.“ 146 Für die amerikanischen

essays in this Festschrift are not about Kandinsky. Although also a well-known scholar on the artist, Rose-Carol Washton Long chose to write about the works of two German modernists, George Grosz and Otto Dix, and to discuss the treatment of Jewish subjects by these artists shortly before the Nazi

ROSE-CAROL WASHTON LONG

George Grosz: Berlin, New York, p. 463. But the 1997 Royal Academy catalog calls the drawing German Types and states: "Grosz's caricature of the wealthy Jew in this drawing is as crude as anything that later appeared in the Nazi propagandistic paper Der Sti�r7ner." See The Berlin of

KARL TOEPFER

positions; he allowed the Party to extend to Laban invita- tions for productions and proposals. But Goebbels distrusted Laban and re- garded him as an opportunist whose intellectuality betrayed a lack of sincere feeling for the Nazi vision of a purified Germany. With his production of Im Tauwind (1936), for

ANDREAS HÜNEKE

There was still a nearly-impermeable border running through the middle of Germany when Vivian Barnett announced her visit to me in Potsdam in 1988 - from the other side of the Wall - to hear more details about the Vasilii Kandinsky watercolor that had been seized as "degenerate art" by the Nazis

JOHN E. BOWLT

Liamin, Fedor Petrov- sky, Boris Shaposhnikov, German Zhidkov, and Vasilii Zubov were "con- firmed dismissed"; while Vladimir Adariukov, Ivan Chetverikov, Vladimir Domogatsky, Abram Efros, Alexander Gabrichevsky, Akim Kondratiev, Alexander Larionov, Dmitrii Nedovich, Pavel Popov, Sergei Popov, Shpet

MILKA BLIZNAKOV

Japan (1945). Although the mon- strous Babylon (i.e., Nazi Germany) was obliterated, the future did not look bright as the Iron Curtain descended to divide the world into two competing camps, so it is not surprising that social utopias (banned in Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union) were replaced in the