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Germany after Unification

Coming to Terms with the Recent Past

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Edited by Gert-Joachim Glaessner

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Edited by Anthony Grenville

The Research Centre for German and Austrian Exile Studies was founded in 1995, basing itself at the Institute of Germanic Studies of the University of London. Professor J.M. Ritchie became Chairman of the Research Centre, whose members are Dr Charmian Brinson, Professor Richard Dove, Dr Marian Malet, Dr Jennifer Taylor and Professor Ian Wallace, with Dr Anthony Grenville as Honorary Secretary. The aim of the Research Centre is to promote research in the field of German-speaking exiles in Great Britain. To this end it organises conferences and publishes their proceedings, holds research seminars, and publishes its own Yearbook. Its members cooperate in the writing of scholarly studies, including a book about the German-speaking refugees from Hitler in Britain, Home from Home?, and a study of the Austrian Centre in London, 1939-47. Though the Research Centre has primarily concerned itself with the German-speaking refugees from Nazism in Britain, it aims to extend its scope to include German-speaking exiles of other periods and comparable groups such as the Czech refugees from Hitler or Italian anti-Fascists. Given its location near the heart of the principal centre of settlement of the refugees from Germany, the Research Centre readily provides advice and useful contacts to scholars and postgraduates working in the field.

Arts in Exile in Britain 1933-1945

Politics and Cultural Identity

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Edited by Shulamith Behr and Marian Malet

This volume focuses on the contribution of refugees from Nazism to the Arts in Britain. The essays examine the much neglected theme of art in internment and address the spheres of photography, political satire, sculpture, architecture, artists’ organisations, institutional models, dealership and conservation. These are considered under the broad headings ‘Art as Politics’, ‘Between the Public and the Domestic’ and ‘Creating Frameworks’. Such categories assist in posing questions regarding the politics of identity and gender, as well as providing an opportunity to explore the complex issues of cultural formation. The volume will be of interest to scholars and students of twentieth-century art history, museum and conservation studies, politics and cultural studies, in addition to those involved in German Studies and in German and Austrian Exile Studies.

Beyond Pug's Tour

National and Ethnic Stereotyping in Theory and Literary Practice

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Edited by C.C. Barfoot

At a time when the world, Europe especially, is once more threatened by murderous conflicts between groups of people claiming ethnic and national identity as a basis for sovereignty over specific territories, it is timely to consider the part that literature has played and is playing in the creation of ethnic and national stereotypes. What role do such stereotypes have in literature? How are they created? From what materials are they constructed? What purpose do ethnic and national stereotypes serve? Can it ever be a useful one? Are they avoidable? Can we live without them? What can be done about the deleterious effects they may be thought to produce? Stereotyping is worldwide — is there a tribe, race and nation in existence which escapes being stereotyped by its neighbours? In what sense are these stereotypes accurate? How are these stereotypes reflected in and reinforced by literature? Should and can literature do anything about them? In Beyond Pug's Tour: National and Ethnic Stereotyping in Theory and Literary Practice, literary scholars, as well as academics engaged in sociological and psychological research, consider these and other questions by examining the work of specific authors and the circumstances in which stereotyping plays such a crucial part.

A Space of Anxiety

Dislocation and Abjection in Modern German-Jewish Literature

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Anne Fuchs

A Space of Anxiety engages with a body of German-Jewish literature that, from the beginning of the century onwards, explores notions of identity and kinship in the context of migration, exile and persecution. The study offers an engaging analysis of how Freud, Kafka, Roth, Drach and Hilsenrath employ, to varying degrees, the travel paradigm to question those borders and boundaries that define the space between the self and the other. A Space of Anxiety argues that from Freud to Hilsenrath, German-Jewish literature emerges from an ambivalent space of enunciation which challenges the great narrative of an historical identity authenticated by an originary past. Inspired by postcolonial and psychoanalytic theories, the author shows that modern German-Jewish writers inhabit a Third Space which poses an alternative to an understanding of culture as a homogeneous tradition based on (national) unity.
By endeavouring to explore this third space in examples of modern German-Jewish literature, the volume also aims to contribute to recent efforts to rewriting literary history. In retracing the inherent ambivalence in how German-Jewish literature situates itself in cultural discourse, this study focuses on how this literature subverts received notions of identity and racial boundaries. The study is of interest to students of German literature, German-Jewish literature and Cultural Studies.