Search Results

The Vices of Learning

Morality and Knowledge at Early Modern Universities

Series:

Sari Kivisto

In The Vices of Learning: Morality and Knowledge at Early Modern Universities, Sari Kivistö examines scholarly vices in the late Baroque and early Enlightenment periods. Moral criticism of the learned was a favourite theme of Latin dissertations, treatises and satires written in Germany ca. 1670–1730. Works on scholarly pride, logomachy, curiosity and other vices kept the presses running at German Protestant universities as well as farther north. Kivistö shows how scholars constructed fame and how the process involved various means of producing celebrity. The book industry, plagiarism and impressive titles were all labelled dishonest means of advancing a career. In The Vices of Learning Kivistö argues that scholarly ethics was an essential part of the early modern intellectual framework.

Series:

G. Anthony Keddie

religion as ideology and thus as a façade that simultaneously masks class exploitation and relieves the pains caused by it. Weberians, however, describe religion (i.e., Protestant Christianity) in more positive terms as being responsible for economic rationalization by middle class individuals and thus for

Series:

G. Anthony Keddie

nineteenth and early twentieth centuries generated some of our still-persistent ideas about apocalypticism. They did so in the midst of highly polemical political debates over the impact of economic structures on the moral and social progress of the individual man and the role of (Protestant) Christianity in

Series:

G. Anthony Keddie

resistance take on different nuances in concert with the different phases of scholarship on apocalyptic literature we encountered in chapter 1. Thus, late nineteenth and early twentieth century Protestant scholars often viewed the text as anti-hierocratic opposition to the Temple and Sanhedrin; 127 mid to

Borrowed Place

Mission Stations and Local Adaption in Early Twentieth-Century Hunan

Series:

Riika-Leena Juntunen

In Borrowed Place: Mission Stations and Local Adaption in Early Twentieth-Century Hunan Riika-Leena Juntunen creates a microhistorical narrative around the establishment, reception, and development of Lizhou protestant stations during the turbulent years of popular nationalism and early communist activity. The book examines the changing place identity around the stations from political, religious, ritual, cultural, and gendered perspectives, revealing a Chinese semi-religious community with varying motivations and in constant dialogue with its surroundings. The group developed its own normative code and hierarchy, and it offered both economic and religious benefits according to local models. Yet the developing political situation also meant it had to solve the question of anti-foreignism to be able to continue its existence.

Elizabeth Coatsworth and Gale R. Owen-Crocker

which are considered protocanonical). These books are considered canonical by the Roman Catholic and Orthodox churches and apocryphal by most Protestant churches. The Anglican church in the words of the King James Bible, nevertheless regarded them as suitable to be read ‘for example of life and

Elizabeth Coatsworth and Gale R. Owen-Crocker

conservation institutions Germany Brunswick, Lower Saxony, Germany Martinikirche Martinikirche, an important medieval church of Brunswick (Braunschweig) which became a Protestant church at the Reformation. In the nineteenth century, however, the garment belonged to the painter Karl Friedrich Lessing, Karl