Looking through a Glass Bible

Postdisciplinary Biblical Interpretations from the Glasgow School

Series:

Edited by A.K.M. Adam and Samuel Tongue

Some biblical interpreters’ imaginations extend only as far as outlandish source theories or esoteric hypothetical audiences. The interpretive energies let loose in Glasgow over the past decade or so, however, have produced a cadre of interpreters who defy the disciplinary mandates of biblical criticisms in favour of reading the Bible with imaginations both careful and carefree. Infused with literary, political, art-critical, cinematic, liturgical and other interests, these essays display interpretive verve freed from the anxiety of disciplines — with closely observed insights, critical engagement with biblical texts, and vivid inspiration from the cultural world within which they are set.

Here there is no "gap" between world and text, but the intimate congeniality of close, dear, comfortable interpretive friends.

Contributors: Ben Morse, Hugh Pyper, Alastair Hunter, Hannah Strømmen, Jonathan C. P. Birch, Anna Fisk, Kuloba Wabyanga Robert, Samuel Tongue, A. K. M. Adam, Abigail Pelham, and the Religarts Collective (with Yvonne Sherwood).

Michael J. Thate

Scrolls, Nag Hammadi codices, as well as numerous manuscript and papyri discoveries, has introduced a revitalizing energy within studies devoted to early Judaism, Christianity, Old Testament Pseudepigrapha and the New Testament Apocrypha. According to the editors of New Vistas on Early Judaism and

J.C.H. Lebram

in Sfire and in the second Nerab text can function as an absolute infinitive. Can one really speak with certainty about an original energic function of the so-called energic imperfect? (par. 6.6.6.2.1/2.). Why is an imperative less courteous than an imperfect (par. 6.6.6.4.2.)? Such a conclusion in

Lester L. Grabbe

emerge are the abysmal lack of defence planning by the rebel regime and the extremes to which various factions would go to fight one another instead of devoting their energies to preparing for the inevitable Roman offensive. Decisions seem to have been political rather than military ones. When it came to

A. Hilhorst

used might yield a number of overlooked titles. Ac- curate research-assistants could learn a lot by accomplishing this job. It would be utterly unfair to end this review by talking about inevitable imperfections. The Bibliography is a masterpiece of expertise and energy. By its comprehensiveness, its

M. De Jonge

for Qumran" (p. 283), an event which, according to the author, took place in the time of either Jonathan or Simon. On the other hand Jub. presupposes the conflicts which resulted from the religious policy of Antiochus Epiphanes. The author spends a lot of energy and space in an attempt to prove that

A.S. Van Der Woude

for Qumran" (p. 283), an event which, according to the author, took place in the time of either Jonathan or Simon. On the other hand Jub. presupposes the conflicts which resulted from the religious policy of Antiochus Epiphanes. The author spends a lot of energy and space in an attempt to prove that

scholars, but which is interesting enough to be explored with energy). V. D. W. REVIEW OF BOOKS L. DÍEZ MERINO, La Biblia babilónica, Sección Targúmica, Avda. Pio XII, 31, Madrid-16, Madrid 1975, 328 S. (Seit der Veroffentlichung der dritten Auflage der Biblia Hebraica (1937) ist in steigendem Masse der

scholars, but which is interesting enough to be explored with energy). V. D. W. REVIEW OF BOOKS L. DÍEZ MERINO, La Biblia babilónica, Sección Targúmica, Avda. Pio XII, 31, Madrid-16, Madrid 1975, 328 S. (Seit der Veroffentlichung der dritten Auflage der Biblia Hebraica (1937) ist in steigendem Masse der

Jacob Neusner

build there . . . let us do this together. . . . They invest their energies in what they build. Their relationship with the place is not purely con- tractual. They helped build it, it is of their making. What we build embodies something of us. At the same time the people of the town have made it clear