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Coping with the Future

Theories and Practices of Divination in East Asia

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Edited by Michael Lackner

Coping with the Future: Theories and Practices of Divination in East Asia offers insights into various techniques of divination, their evolution, and their assessment. The contributions cover the period from the earliest documents on East Asian mantic arts to their appearance in the present time.
The volume reflects the pervasive manifestations of divination in literature, religious and political life, and their relevance for society and individuals. Special emphasis is placed on cross-cultural influences and attempts to find theoretical foundations for divinatory practices. This edited volume is an initiative to study the phenomena of divination across East Asian cultures and beyond. It is also one of the first attempts to theorize divinatory practices through East Asian traditions.

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Iris Seri-Hersch

: physical energy, mental energy, perseverance, reliability, autonomy, modesty, initiative, self-control, leadership, obedience, objectivity, sincerity, loyalty, altruism, and courtesy. The qualities were reflected upon not only in Character Aims , but also in the Handbook to Elementary Education for Boys

Fenggang Yang and J. E. E. Pettit

, Buddhism in Jiangxi has been actively engaging with the rapidly changing society. In 2013, the Jiangxi Buddhist Academy ( Jiangxi Foxueyuan 江西佛学院) launched a hotline for psychological mindfulness ( zhengnian xinli rexian 正念心理热线). The academy did so out of concern for the overflow of “negative energies

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John T. P. Lai

, 18. 43 Shen, Gushi canzhen , 321–322. 44 Preface to Banyan Xinfuliang zhiming . 45 Victor Turner, From Ritual to Theatre: The Human Seriousness of Play (New York: paj Publications, 1982), 86. 46 “Communion of Saints” refers to the spiritual union and mutual interchange of supernatural energies

Fenggang Yang and J. E. E. Pettit

immortal being. The practices of developing the inner alchemy are very abstract and metaphysical. They consist of building a foundation within the body, combining yin-yang visualization, ingesting medicines, and circulating fire energy throughout the body. Daoist rituals are also performed in the local

Fenggang Yang and J. E. E. Pettit

’s Qigong movement, which emerged in the late 1980s and the 1990s along with numerous meditative practices based on the discovery and manipulation of qi 气 energy. In May 1992, Li Hongzhi declared himself to be a Qigong master and delivered a series of public lectures at a middle school in Changchun. 39

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John T. P. Lai

of the energy that pervades the whole of the universe. See Ingrid Fischer-Schreiber, The Shambhala Dictionary of Taoism , trans. Werner Wünsche (Boston: Shambhala Publications, 1996), 136–137. 70 “Know ye not that ye are the temple of God, and that the Spirit of God dwelleth in you?” (1 Corinthians

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Catherine Mayeur-Jaouen

breadth, which is both longer and vaster than that of the redefinitions, to give adab back its energy and depth. It is important to measure the extent to which, contrary to what contemporaries of the Nahḍa (and many of our contemporaries) and the historians of the nineteenth century often believed

Narayanan, Vasudha

Ātiparācakti (Skt. Ādiparāśakti; “The Primordial, Supreme Energy/Power”) of Melmaruvathur is a local deity whose popularity has increased dramatically in the last two decades, but who is still mainly known in South India. Like many other deities, she, too, has become a transnational goddess when

Timalsina, Sthaneshwar

The term śakti stems from the Sanskrit root śak-, “to have power to effect,” with a suffix -ktin, indicating the feminine gender. In general, the term refers to power, strength, or energy. In the religious context, Śakti stands for the Goddess (Devī), or the powers of the deities. From vedic Agni