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Rivers in the Mediterranean have always been hotspots of social formation. From antiquity to the present, rivers were important sources of fresh water, transport routes and energy suppliers as well as spaces of interaction between sea, coast and hinterland. This volume takes up recent debates on the spatial turn and global history, which have fundamentally changed notions of the Mediterranean as a natural given and of larger areas as well-defined entities. After an introduction to the relevant research contexts, it offers a collection of articles on the conceptualization of river histories, the Mediterranean and its rivers, and river studies from around the globe

at a specific time, but also tied intrinsically to the larger scale and longer time frame in such a way that they inherit from them many of their structural (hydrological, topological, energy) properties. In order to understand international and regional hydropolitics in river basins and the

In: Mediterranean Rivers in Global Perspective

transport routes, and as suppliers of energy, rivers have been important hotspots of human community formation from antiquity to the present day; it hardly needs to be pointed out that most historically grown cities have developed in symbiosis with rivers. At the same time, due to the difficult

In: Mediterranean Rivers in Global Perspective

Ernennung keinerlei Ahnung gehabt habe. Seinen ersten Vorgesetzten, den Chef der Erziehungsabteilung in der Provinz Westfalen, George Savage, charakterisierte Walsh als „a Canadian with little knowledge of German or Germany but with much energy and goodwill.“ 22 Der Leiter der nordrhein

In: Briten in Westfalen 1945-2017

Mediterranean Sea itself – or what one could call the maritime Mediterranean –, but instead focus on the rivers in the Mediterranean area, or what one could call the fluvial Mediterranean. 12 Like other rivers in the Mediterranean, the Nile is an important resource for water, food, and energy. It serves as a

In: Mediterranean Rivers in Global Perspective

Westphalia was Lt-Colonel George Savage, a Canadian with little knowledge of German and Germany but with much energy and goodwill. He asked me to go with him to see Pastor Friedrich von Bodelschwingh of Bethel near Bielefeld, a home for physically and mentally handicapped young people … . After a few weeks

In: Briten in Westfalen 1945-2017

. So the rivers were an indispensable economic resource, especially under pre-modern conditions where neither cheap transport of goods nor alternative energy supply was available. But I think smaller rivers only reveal their full value in historical analysis if a larger scale is taken into

In: Mediterranean Rivers in Global Perspective

time and energy in disputes over etiquette with the other ambassadors” than with their Ottoman hosts (169). The last chapter addresses three aspects of diplomatic negotiations and conflicts: consular matters such as the legal protection of British merchants; disputes regarding British privateering in

In: Journal of Early Modern History

time and energy in disputes over etiquette with the other ambassadors” than with their Ottoman hosts (169). The last chapter addresses three aspects of diplomatic negotiations and conflicts: consular matters such as the legal protection of British merchants; disputes regarding British privateering in

In: Journal of Early Modern History

This paper examines the historical relationship between the Little Ice Age and the Anthropocene, which has not yet been studied. The Little Ice Age is the coldest multi-century period in the Holocene. The reforestation of huge farmlands, abandoned due to pandemics in the Americas, aggravated the cooling weather of the Little Ice Age. It was in the long and severe cold of the Little Ice Age that the transition from renewable energy to non-renewable energy was completed in Britain in the latter part of the eighteenth century, and when the pattern of linear growth in greenhouse gas concentrations was forged in the ecosystems of the Earth. The Little Ice Age forced humans to depend on fossil fuels while the advent of warmer and more stable climate in the Holocene enabled them to start agriculture in an energy revolution 11,000 years ago, thus making the coming of the Anthropocene possible.

In: Asian Review of World Histories