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Edited by Veronica Kelly

AUSTRALIAN THEATRE in the 1990s is a vigorous enterprise displaying the energies and contradictions of a multicultural society. This collection of essays by leading scholars of Australian theatre and drama surveys the emergence and directions of the new theatrical energies which have challenged or redefined the Australian 'mainstream': Aboriginal, multicultural, Asian-Australian, women's, gay and lesbian, community and young people's theatre; and charts the exciting growth of physical theatre. The contributors assess the impact of evolving funding and industrial priorities, and examine the theoretical and cultural debates surrounding Australian playwriting and theatre-making from the 1970s Vietnam dramas to the postmodern present.

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Edited by Ogaga Okuyade

The essays in this volume capture the exciting energy of the emergent novel in East and West Africa, drawing on diffe¬rent theoretical insights to offer fresh and engaging perspectives on what has been variously termed the ‘new wave’, ‘emer¬gent generation’, and ‘third generation’. Subjects addressed include the politics of identity, especially when (re)constructed outside the homeland or when African indigenous values are eroded by globaliz¬ation, transnationalism, and the exilic condition or the self undergoes fragmen¬tation. Other essays examine once-taboo concerns, including gendered accounts of same-sex sexualities.
Most of the essays deal with shifting perceptions by African women of their social condition in patriarchy in relation to such issues as polygamy, adultery, male domination, and the woman’s quest for fulfilment and respect through access to quality education and full economic and socio-political participation. Themes taken up by other novels examined in¬clude the sexual exploitation of women and criminality generally and the ex¬posure of children to violence. Likewise examined is the contemporary textual¬izing of orality (the trickster figure).
Writers discussed include Chima¬manda Ngozi Adichie, Okey Ndibe, Helon Habila, Ike Oguine, Chris Abani, Tanure Ojaide, Maik Nwosu, Unoma Azuah, Jude Dibia, Lola Shoneyin, Mary Karooro Okurut, Violet Barungi, Adaobi Tricia Nwaubani, Abidemi Sanusi, Akachi Ezeigbo, Sefi Atta, Kaine Agary, Kojo Laing, Ahmadou Kourouma, Uwen Akpan, and Alobwed’Epie

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David Crouch

This chapter considers ideas of land and identity processes through an original consideration of landscape. Following Taussig’s argument that cultural meaning and identification are less constituted in institutionalised and ritualised signification than emergent in the performance of life, attention focuses upon the performative character of landscape and its relationality with land and identity (1992). For over a decade landscape has been exemplary of the critical debates between representational and so-called non-representational theories affecting cultural geographies and related disciplines. At the same time discussions concerning mobility, in for example the relative irrelevance of institutional borders and the occurrence of translocal identities contest the familiar emphasis upon the habitual and situated character of landscape, identity and its role in the work of representations. This paper offers a contribution to the growing awareness of a need to try and engage these debates surrounding landscape across disciplines. Making land significant in life is considered through landscape in the notion of spacing. The notion of an everyday, gentle politics is introduced to the constitution of identities and feelings of land. This approach is pursued particularly in terms of how we understand artwork and representation, insistently in comparison with wider kinds of practice. Landscape is considered as the performative expressive-poetics of spacing in a way that makes possible an always emergent dynamic relationality between representations, practices and identities. Finally, identities and values concerning land are produced relationally in the energy cracks between performativity and institutions, as the several investigations upon which this chapter draws testify

Critique of Rationality

Judgement and Creativity from Benjamin to Merleau-Ponty

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John E. O'Brien

In his Critique of Rationality, John Eustice O’Brien proposes a fascinating rectification for the distortion of technical necessity in Western Society due to unbridled instrumental reason. He begins with a review of this issue first raised by the Early German Romantics as discussed by Isaiah Berlin and Walter Benjamin. Following French social philosopher Maurice Merleau-Ponty’s radically different apperceptive epistemology, he explores the possibility of a social world in which each is anchored by a préobjective disposition to meaning based on the intersubjective presence of all. This justifies the postulate of aesthetic-consciousness as the site of socialization in communities of meaning, as a frame for judgment and creativity. The struggle must continue for awakening that consciousness if an open society is to be realized.

Andrew N. Rowan, Tamara Kartal and John Hadidian

. In a poll conducted by YouGov in March 2017, commissioned by Humane Society International, only 33% of the Scottish public found it acceptable to trap and kill feral cats and 60% found it unacceptable (YouGov, March 2017). TNR projects can call on the energy and time of a substantial number of

Anne Fawcett

.-J. , & Yang , C.-J. ( 2016 ). “ Combined active solar and geothermal heating: a renewable and environmentally friendly energy source in pig houses ”. Environmental Progress & Sustainable Energy , 35 , 1156 – 1165 . Kahler , S.C. ( 2015 ). “ Moral stress the top trigger in veterinarians’ compassion

Line Kollerup Oftedal and Jes Lynning Harfeld

another human being. Human societal and cultural norms, standards and ideals such as having a (good) job, providing for oneself and one’s family, having the energy to volunteer at the local shelter or kids club and the like are standards that dogs do not care about. They do not have such expectations on

Ireland in Writing

Interviews with Writers and Academics

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Jacqueline Hurtley, Rosa González and Esther Aliaga

As the twentieth century draws to a close, Ireland in Writing: Interviews with Writers and Academics focuses on the textual mapping of the country over the century through the creative energies and intellectual reflections of a selection of writers and educators at the tertiary level. The volume is a collection of eleven interviews held by three university teachers and a research assistant, all resident in Spain. The interviews with both male and female writers and academics, who hail from Northern Ireland and the Republic, have been conducted over the 1990s. The writers were quizzed about their own writing: how it came into being, who or what they have looked to as inspirational and how their novels, short stories, poetry and plays relate to Ireland past and present. The academics express views on their critical theories and practices, on particular areas of interest, on English and Irish in Ireland, on contemporary writing and cultural dynamics: from Friel to Telefís Éireann, passing through Field Day, the Abbey and the question of a hybrid Irish identity.

Germany and Eastern Europe

Cultural Identities and Cultural Differences

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Edited by Keith Bullivant, Geoffrey Giles and Walter Pape

The opening up, and subsequent tearing down, of the Berlin Wall in 1989 effectively ended a historically unique period for Europe that had drastically changed its face over a period of fifty years and redefined, in all sorts of ways, what was meant by East and West. For Germany in particular this radical change meant much more than unification of the divided country, although initially this process seemed to consume all of the country's energies and emotions. While the period of the Cold War saw the emergence of a Federal Republic distinctly Western in orientation, the coming down of the Iron Curtain meant that Germany's relationship with its traditional neighbours to the East and the South-East, which had been essentially frozen or redefined in different ways for the two German states by the Cold War, had to be rediscovered. This volume, which brings together scholars in German Studies from the United States, Germany and other European countries, examines the history of the relationship between Germany and Eastern Europe and the opportunities presented by the changes of the 1990's, drawing particular attention to the interaction between the willingness of German and its Eastern neighbours to work for political and economic inte-gration, on the one hand, and the cultural and social problems that stem from old prejudices and unresolved disputes left over from the Second World War, on the other.

Arts Activism, Education, and Therapies

Transforming Communities Across Africa

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Edited by Hazel Barnes

This second volume of research emanating from Drama for Life, University of the Witwatersrand, explores the transformative and healing qualities of the arts in South Africa, Botswana, Cameroon, Kenya, Rwanda, and Zimbabwe. Essays on arts for social change illuminate the difficulties of conflict-resolution (in war-scarred countries, tertiary institutions, and child-offender programmes) to promote broader understanding of diversity and difference. Further essays focus on arts and healing, in which music therapy diagnoses, repairs, sustains, and enhances collective health. Intervention theatre – in prisons, fieldwork, and the ethics and politics of storytelling – is examined as a basis for collaboration with children and youth. The musical theatre traditions of Botswana’s San people are investigated, as well as the benefits of arts counselling with educators to alleviate psycho-social stress in classrooms. Important insights are provided into ways of applying the arts and raise questions of ethics, effectiveness, and apposite usage.
Also treated is the role of aesthetics in the effectiveness of art, particularly in social contexts. Included are overviews of the ways in which the aesthetics of drama have changed over the past four decades and of the cohesive potential of the arts. How can arts practitioners engage in inter-cultural dialogue to facilitate healing? The energy and inventiveness of the playful mode engender new ways of contending with social issues, whereby the focus is on how theatre affects an audience and on how communication in applied theatre and drama can reach audiences more effectively.
These essays provide an insight into the application of the arts for transformation across Africa. Through their juxtaposition in this volume they speak to the variety and purposes of arts approaches and offer fresh perspectives on and to the field.